Woman shares what it's like not having a vagina, womb or cervix in candid discussion

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By James Kay

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A woman who was born without a vagina, womb, or cervix has opened up about her daily life and how it impacts her.

In an emotional episode of The Daily Mail's podcast, The Apple & The Tree, TV presenter Vogue Williams delves into the deeply personal story of Ally, a woman born without a vagina, womb, or cervix.

The episode explores Ally's relationship with her mother wendy, as well as Ally's journey with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) Syndrome, a rare congenital disorder.

Ally was born without a vagina, womb, or cervix. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Ally, now 42, opens up about her experiences living with MRKH Syndrome, a condition that wasn't discovered until her teenage years.

According to Penn Medicine, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome is "a rare congenital disorder that affects the female reproductive system. This condition is characterized by an underdeveloped vagina and uterus. The uterus may be small or absent and the vagina is typically shortened."

Despite the initial shock and difficulty, Ally has since become an advocate for the MRKH community, sharing her story to raise awareness and support others facing similar challenges.

Ally's mother, Wendy, shared her perspective on Ally's diagnosis and the impact it had on their family. 

By the time Ally was taking her GCSEs, which is usually when you're aged 15 or 16 in the UK, she hadn't gotten her first period.

Ally is unable to have children. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Medical professionals told her to come back in nine months if she hadn't got one, and after the time had passed, she still hadn't.

"They don't draw conclusions, you don't believe those conclusions exist, they don't go to worst-case scenarios, because you don't believe that there's a worst-case scenario," Wendy said.

One of the most poignant moments came when Ally courageously asked her mother about her feelings regarding never having grandchildren.

Wendy's response was filled with honesty and acceptance: "Oh, I don't give a f***!"

"No, honestly and truly. No, I really didn't Ally, I genuinely, truly really didn't," she continued. "As much as I love you, I'm not naturally a maternal person. I only loved you because you were mine. Because I knew early on that you weren't going to be able to have kids, I adjusted to reality.

"That's the funniest thing you've said. Never ever ever. I'm not just bulls***ing, I'm speaking my truth."

Throughout the episode, Ally and Wendy navigate sensitive topics such as relationships, self-worth, and societal pressures with grace and honesty.

Ally said: "A lot of women with MRKH go on to be a little promiscuous to prove womanhood. You want to prove your worth, you're like 'I am desirable, if I can't have kids I want to do this right'."

Ally has Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) Syndrome. Credit: ericsphotography/Getty

"I have had such a wonderful close relationship with my mum since I was diagnosed at the age of 16 and I think we demonstrate how we can have really hard conversations about difficult topics," Ally concluded.

Wendy added: "The dynamic of our relationship because of MRKH has gone deeper, more personal than the bulk of relationships between mother and daughter. It is a blessing actually."

Featured image credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Woman shares what it's like not having a vagina, womb or cervix in candid discussion

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

A woman who was born without a vagina, womb, or cervix has opened up about her daily life and how it impacts her.

In an emotional episode of The Daily Mail's podcast, The Apple & The Tree, TV presenter Vogue Williams delves into the deeply personal story of Ally, a woman born without a vagina, womb, or cervix.

The episode explores Ally's relationship with her mother wendy, as well as Ally's journey with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) Syndrome, a rare congenital disorder.

Ally was born without a vagina, womb, or cervix. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Ally, now 42, opens up about her experiences living with MRKH Syndrome, a condition that wasn't discovered until her teenage years.

According to Penn Medicine, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome is "a rare congenital disorder that affects the female reproductive system. This condition is characterized by an underdeveloped vagina and uterus. The uterus may be small or absent and the vagina is typically shortened."

Despite the initial shock and difficulty, Ally has since become an advocate for the MRKH community, sharing her story to raise awareness and support others facing similar challenges.

Ally's mother, Wendy, shared her perspective on Ally's diagnosis and the impact it had on their family. 

By the time Ally was taking her GCSEs, which is usually when you're aged 15 or 16 in the UK, she hadn't gotten her first period.

Ally is unable to have children. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Medical professionals told her to come back in nine months if she hadn't got one, and after the time had passed, she still hadn't.

"They don't draw conclusions, you don't believe those conclusions exist, they don't go to worst-case scenarios, because you don't believe that there's a worst-case scenario," Wendy said.

One of the most poignant moments came when Ally courageously asked her mother about her feelings regarding never having grandchildren.

Wendy's response was filled with honesty and acceptance: "Oh, I don't give a f***!"

"No, honestly and truly. No, I really didn't Ally, I genuinely, truly really didn't," she continued. "As much as I love you, I'm not naturally a maternal person. I only loved you because you were mine. Because I knew early on that you weren't going to be able to have kids, I adjusted to reality.

"That's the funniest thing you've said. Never ever ever. I'm not just bulls***ing, I'm speaking my truth."

Throughout the episode, Ally and Wendy navigate sensitive topics such as relationships, self-worth, and societal pressures with grace and honesty.

Ally said: "A lot of women with MRKH go on to be a little promiscuous to prove womanhood. You want to prove your worth, you're like 'I am desirable, if I can't have kids I want to do this right'."

Ally has Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) Syndrome. Credit: ericsphotography/Getty

"I have had such a wonderful close relationship with my mum since I was diagnosed at the age of 16 and I think we demonstrate how we can have really hard conversations about difficult topics," Ally concluded.

Wendy added: "The dynamic of our relationship because of MRKH has gone deeper, more personal than the bulk of relationships between mother and daughter. It is a blessing actually."

Featured image credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty