Hooters divides social media users after sponsoring under-10s soccer team

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By Carina Murphy

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A Hooters restaurant has sparked controversy after announcing that they'd be sponsoring a local boys soccer team.

According to a report by the New York Post, Hooters Nottingham - which is based in the UK - took to social media to share the exciting news that they'd be sponsoring an under-10s side.

"Hooters Nottingham are proud to be the new sponsors of Burton Joyce Under 10s. We wish you all the luck this season boys. Go smash it," the restaurant wrote in a now-deleted Facebook post.

Servers at the raunchy restaurant chain are renowned for wearing low-cut tops and tiny orange shorts. In a series of snaps that accompanied their announcement, members of staff could be seen more modestly dressed in Hooters tracksuits as they visited the team of young boys.

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Hooters in Nottingham, England. Credit: Mark Richardson / Alamy

While it's unclear what exactly the sponsorship deal will entail, it's evident from the photos that the boys' soccer kit will feature Hooters' recognizable logo.

Meanwhile, news of the unlikely collaboration caused many people on social media to kick up a fuss. Some questioned whether it was appropriate for minors to be associated with a restaurant that is often sexualized.

One tweeted: "Why is a de facto sexual entertainment venue sponsoring a children’s football team? Imagine if an under-10s girls team was sponsored by the Chippendales & some of the girls posed with Chippendale dancers for a photoshoot?"

"How either the club or Hooters thought this was an appropriate partnership for an U10s football team is beyond me. If this were the Magic Mike (male semi-naked dancers) brand sponsoring a girls netball team, there would rightly be uproar," another agreed.

A third chimed in: "How the heck is this happening? May be great for the lads but what about the girl football squad. What message does it give to them?"

However, others were clearly unbothered by the sponsorship and didn't see any reason to start picking sides.

"Why are people getting so angry about this?! They’ve obvs never been to Hooters! A great bar, clearly with an excellent marketing plan and supporting a local team where the kids might not get a kit otherwise. People need to chill out and go get a beer," one person tweeted.

"Kids are allowed @Hootersnotts and eat free on Sundays," another pointed out.

Nevertheless, the Nottingham eatery appears to have removed the announcement from its social media channels in the wake of the controversy.

Additionally, contrary to popular opinion, Hooters restaurants and bars are not adults only and welcome diners of all ages.

Featured Image Credit: Kristoffer Tripplaar / Alamy

Hooters divides social media users after sponsoring under-10s soccer team

vt-author-image

By Carina Murphy

Article saved!Article saved!

A Hooters restaurant has sparked controversy after announcing that they'd be sponsoring a local boys soccer team.

According to a report by the New York Post, Hooters Nottingham - which is based in the UK - took to social media to share the exciting news that they'd be sponsoring an under-10s side.

"Hooters Nottingham are proud to be the new sponsors of Burton Joyce Under 10s. We wish you all the luck this season boys. Go smash it," the restaurant wrote in a now-deleted Facebook post.

Servers at the raunchy restaurant chain are renowned for wearing low-cut tops and tiny orange shorts. In a series of snaps that accompanied their announcement, members of staff could be seen more modestly dressed in Hooters tracksuits as they visited the team of young boys.

wp-image-1263167612 size-full
Hooters in Nottingham, England. Credit: Mark Richardson / Alamy

While it's unclear what exactly the sponsorship deal will entail, it's evident from the photos that the boys' soccer kit will feature Hooters' recognizable logo.

Meanwhile, news of the unlikely collaboration caused many people on social media to kick up a fuss. Some questioned whether it was appropriate for minors to be associated with a restaurant that is often sexualized.

One tweeted: "Why is a de facto sexual entertainment venue sponsoring a children’s football team? Imagine if an under-10s girls team was sponsored by the Chippendales & some of the girls posed with Chippendale dancers for a photoshoot?"

"How either the club or Hooters thought this was an appropriate partnership for an U10s football team is beyond me. If this were the Magic Mike (male semi-naked dancers) brand sponsoring a girls netball team, there would rightly be uproar," another agreed.

A third chimed in: "How the heck is this happening? May be great for the lads but what about the girl football squad. What message does it give to them?"

However, others were clearly unbothered by the sponsorship and didn't see any reason to start picking sides.

"Why are people getting so angry about this?! They’ve obvs never been to Hooters! A great bar, clearly with an excellent marketing plan and supporting a local team where the kids might not get a kit otherwise. People need to chill out and go get a beer," one person tweeted.

"Kids are allowed @Hootersnotts and eat free on Sundays," another pointed out.

Nevertheless, the Nottingham eatery appears to have removed the announcement from its social media channels in the wake of the controversy.

Additionally, contrary to popular opinion, Hooters restaurants and bars are not adults only and welcome diners of all ages.

Featured Image Credit: Kristoffer Tripplaar / Alamy