Man reveals why he drinks up to seven pints of his own urine a day

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By VT

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A 26-year-old man who hails from Germany has revealed why he drinks up to seven pints of his own urine each day, claiming that the practice is beneficial to his physical and mental health.

Jan Schünemann, who also reportedly puts urine on his skin and around his eyes, is a sports coach and student and has always been willing to try out unusual methods in a bid to boost his wellbeing.

The 26-year-old started kickboxing aged 14 before discovering the ancient martial art of Kalaripayattu - also known as Kalari - which extols the virtues of discipline, respect, patience, humility and physical and mental strength.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CCLeHW-oQQT/]]

It was while engaging in this practice that Jan discovered urine therapy, known as Shivambu Kalpa, back in 2017.

The practice argues that the body is self-sustaining and that urine consumption allows the body to heal itself. Jan embraced the idea and has since been drinking anywhere between three and seven pints of his own urine a day.

Jan claims that this urine therapy had led to him never getting sick, giving him more energy. He says he's in the best shape of his life and that he only needs four hours of sleep a night as his energy levels are so high. He says his quality of life has improved dramatically since he began drinking his own urine, though admits it's important to find a balance.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CEtYUzlIR1R/]]

Sometimes, he revealed, he will leave his urine to age before drinking it, something he describes as a more advanced practice.

Jan is sharing his journey on Instagram and YouTube, where he hopes to inspire others to go down the same route as him.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CEt_ZQWoIhq/]]

However, per the Metro, many doctors strongly advise against the practice, since urine contains waste products that could prove harmful if consumed in large quantities. There is no officially recognized medical evidence to support claims of urine's healing powers.

Man reveals why he drinks up to seven pints of his own urine a day

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

A 26-year-old man who hails from Germany has revealed why he drinks up to seven pints of his own urine each day, claiming that the practice is beneficial to his physical and mental health.

Jan Schünemann, who also reportedly puts urine on his skin and around his eyes, is a sports coach and student and has always been willing to try out unusual methods in a bid to boost his wellbeing.

The 26-year-old started kickboxing aged 14 before discovering the ancient martial art of Kalaripayattu - also known as Kalari - which extols the virtues of discipline, respect, patience, humility and physical and mental strength.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CCLeHW-oQQT/]]

It was while engaging in this practice that Jan discovered urine therapy, known as Shivambu Kalpa, back in 2017.

The practice argues that the body is self-sustaining and that urine consumption allows the body to heal itself. Jan embraced the idea and has since been drinking anywhere between three and seven pints of his own urine a day.

Jan claims that this urine therapy had led to him never getting sick, giving him more energy. He says he's in the best shape of his life and that he only needs four hours of sleep a night as his energy levels are so high. He says his quality of life has improved dramatically since he began drinking his own urine, though admits it's important to find a balance.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CEtYUzlIR1R/]]

Sometimes, he revealed, he will leave his urine to age before drinking it, something he describes as a more advanced practice.

Jan is sharing his journey on Instagram and YouTube, where he hopes to inspire others to go down the same route as him.

[[instagramwidget||https://www.instagram.com/p/CEt_ZQWoIhq/]]

However, per the Metro, many doctors strongly advise against the practice, since urine contains waste products that could prove harmful if consumed in large quantities. There is no officially recognized medical evidence to support claims of urine's healing powers.