Mom confesses she slept with her partner in hospital bed just two hours after giving birth

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By VT

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In an eyebrow-raising revelation that's sure to spark debates and maybe a few side-eyes, a London-based mother, Deborah Hodge, has boldly admitted to engaging in postpartum intimacy just hours after giving birth.

This admission from Hodge, a well-known body positivity advocate, came during an interview with The Sun and is cracking open a discussion about the often-taboo subject of how soon one can engage in sexual activities after childbirth.

Most medical experts suggest that new moms wait at least six weeks post-birth to allow for physical recovery and healing.

However, Hodge challenges the traditional norms by admitting that she was back between the sheets just two hours after welcoming her fourth child into the world in July 2013. "As Amelia lay in her cot, my partner and I were having a cuddle on the bed, when before I knew it we were having sex," Deborah disclosed to The Sun.

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Credit: Somchai um-im / Getty

Her decision for such a prompt return to sexual activity was attributed to "an incredible closeness" she felt with her then-partner. Hodge added, "I didn’t feel sexy, but I did feel special. It was over so quick that I don’t remember feeling any discomfort, but that could have been because I’d had an epidural. I couldn’t believe we’d done it – I put it down to all the drugs I was on!"

Surprisingly, this encounter happened after the birth of a child that was a 'happy surprise' for Hodge, who was 39 at the time. She thought her chances of getting pregnant again were slim, which makes the birth of her fourth child all the more significant.

The story takes another twist as Hodge mentions that she and her then 24-year-old boyfriend split a few months after their daughter Amelia was born. "It rocked me a bit and I felt quite vulnerable being a single mum with a young baby," she said.

Nonetheless, Hodge believes new mothers shouldn't delay resuming their sex lives. "I do think new mums should get back into the saddle when it comes to sex – putting it off isn’t a good idea," she declared.

The candid mother has been a regular on various talk shows, including UK morning show This Morning, sharing her perspectives on body positivity. She believes in educating her children about body positivity by being comfortable in her skin around them.

This unconventional admission by Hodge is not only fueling conversations around the intimate lives of new parents but also raising questions about how soon is 'too soon' in such delicate matters. With Amelia now starting school, Hodge says she's "finally ready to get back on the dating scene again," and one can only wonder if her bold views will impact her future relationships.

While the jury might still be out on whether such quick resumption of sexual activities is advisable or not, Hodge’s case is undeniably urging us to rethink and possibly redefine what we consider to be 'normal' in the context of postpartum sexuality.

Featured image credit: Team Static / Getty

Mom confesses she slept with her partner in hospital bed just two hours after giving birth

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

In an eyebrow-raising revelation that's sure to spark debates and maybe a few side-eyes, a London-based mother, Deborah Hodge, has boldly admitted to engaging in postpartum intimacy just hours after giving birth.

This admission from Hodge, a well-known body positivity advocate, came during an interview with The Sun and is cracking open a discussion about the often-taboo subject of how soon one can engage in sexual activities after childbirth.

Most medical experts suggest that new moms wait at least six weeks post-birth to allow for physical recovery and healing.

However, Hodge challenges the traditional norms by admitting that she was back between the sheets just two hours after welcoming her fourth child into the world in July 2013. "As Amelia lay in her cot, my partner and I were having a cuddle on the bed, when before I knew it we were having sex," Deborah disclosed to The Sun.

wp-image-1263219271 size-full
Credit: Somchai um-im / Getty

Her decision for such a prompt return to sexual activity was attributed to "an incredible closeness" she felt with her then-partner. Hodge added, "I didn’t feel sexy, but I did feel special. It was over so quick that I don’t remember feeling any discomfort, but that could have been because I’d had an epidural. I couldn’t believe we’d done it – I put it down to all the drugs I was on!"

Surprisingly, this encounter happened after the birth of a child that was a 'happy surprise' for Hodge, who was 39 at the time. She thought her chances of getting pregnant again were slim, which makes the birth of her fourth child all the more significant.

The story takes another twist as Hodge mentions that she and her then 24-year-old boyfriend split a few months after their daughter Amelia was born. "It rocked me a bit and I felt quite vulnerable being a single mum with a young baby," she said.

Nonetheless, Hodge believes new mothers shouldn't delay resuming their sex lives. "I do think new mums should get back into the saddle when it comes to sex – putting it off isn’t a good idea," she declared.

The candid mother has been a regular on various talk shows, including UK morning show This Morning, sharing her perspectives on body positivity. She believes in educating her children about body positivity by being comfortable in her skin around them.

This unconventional admission by Hodge is not only fueling conversations around the intimate lives of new parents but also raising questions about how soon is 'too soon' in such delicate matters. With Amelia now starting school, Hodge says she's "finally ready to get back on the dating scene again," and one can only wonder if her bold views will impact her future relationships.

While the jury might still be out on whether such quick resumption of sexual activities is advisable or not, Hodge’s case is undeniably urging us to rethink and possibly redefine what we consider to be 'normal' in the context of postpartum sexuality.

Featured image credit: Team Static / Getty