Constance Wu says Twitter backlash led to her attempting suicide

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By VT

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If you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Constance Wu returned to Twitter yesterday (July 14) after a three-year absence and revealed that the backlash she received on the social media site in 2019 led to her attempting to take her own life.

The Crazy Rich Asians star faced a tidal wave of anger when she publicly voiced her frustrations at ABC sitcom Fresh Off The Boat being renewed.

Wu, 40, played Jessica Huang, one of the lead roles in the critically acclaimed show, which was seen as a milestone in Asian American representation on television. However, when the announcement was made in May 2019 that a sixth season was on the way, Wu was less than thrilled.

At the time, Wu tweeted: "So upset right now that I’m literally crying. Ugh. F**k” and “F**king hell"

A few days later, the Hustlers actress would clarify her comments, explaining that her anger had stemmed from having to give up a passion project because of the renewal.

But this didn't stop a deluge of angry messages making their way to Wu, who revealed in a lengthy statement on Twitter yesterday that the response to her 2019 outburst had almost driven her to suicide.

Sharing the post with her 200,000 followers, Wu said: "I was afraid of coming back on social media because I almost lost my life from it," elaborating further that "when a few DMs from a fellow Asian actress told me I'd become a blight on the Asian American community, I started feeling like I didn't deserve to live any more."

Describing her tweets as "careless", Wu continued: "That I was a disgrace to AsAms, and they'd be better off without me.

"Looking back, it's surreal that a few DMs convinced me to end my own life, but that's what happened. Luckily, a friend found me and rushed me to the ER."

Fresh Off The Boat did also come in for criticism from the author of the book the show was based upon, Eddie Huang. The 40-year-old director, author, TV presenter, and chef stepped down from the show after one season due to creative differences with ABC.

The controversy didn't end there, however, with Huang writing an impassioned 2015 essay describing his disillusionment with what the sitcom had become. He did, however, share his admiration for the actors involved and retweeted Wu's statement in support, yesterday.

Wu, who revealed in her post that she has written a new book, entitled Making a Scene, concluded her statement by saying: “After a little break from Hollywood and a lot of therapy I feel OK enough to venture back on here (at least for a little bit).

"And even though I’m scared, I’ve decided that I owe it to the me-of-3-years-ago to be brave and share my story so that it might help someone with theirs.”

Once again, if you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Featured image credit: PictureLux / The Hollywood Archive / Alamy

Constance Wu says Twitter backlash led to her attempting suicide

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

If you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Constance Wu returned to Twitter yesterday (July 14) after a three-year absence and revealed that the backlash she received on the social media site in 2019 led to her attempting to take her own life.

The Crazy Rich Asians star faced a tidal wave of anger when she publicly voiced her frustrations at ABC sitcom Fresh Off The Boat being renewed.

Wu, 40, played Jessica Huang, one of the lead roles in the critically acclaimed show, which was seen as a milestone in Asian American representation on television. However, when the announcement was made in May 2019 that a sixth season was on the way, Wu was less than thrilled.

At the time, Wu tweeted: "So upset right now that I’m literally crying. Ugh. F**k” and “F**king hell"

A few days later, the Hustlers actress would clarify her comments, explaining that her anger had stemmed from having to give up a passion project because of the renewal.

But this didn't stop a deluge of angry messages making their way to Wu, who revealed in a lengthy statement on Twitter yesterday that the response to her 2019 outburst had almost driven her to suicide.

Sharing the post with her 200,000 followers, Wu said: "I was afraid of coming back on social media because I almost lost my life from it," elaborating further that "when a few DMs from a fellow Asian actress told me I'd become a blight on the Asian American community, I started feeling like I didn't deserve to live any more."

Describing her tweets as "careless", Wu continued: "That I was a disgrace to AsAms, and they'd be better off without me.

"Looking back, it's surreal that a few DMs convinced me to end my own life, but that's what happened. Luckily, a friend found me and rushed me to the ER."

Fresh Off The Boat did also come in for criticism from the author of the book the show was based upon, Eddie Huang. The 40-year-old director, author, TV presenter, and chef stepped down from the show after one season due to creative differences with ABC.

The controversy didn't end there, however, with Huang writing an impassioned 2015 essay describing his disillusionment with what the sitcom had become. He did, however, share his admiration for the actors involved and retweeted Wu's statement in support, yesterday.

Wu, who revealed in her post that she has written a new book, entitled Making a Scene, concluded her statement by saying: “After a little break from Hollywood and a lot of therapy I feel OK enough to venture back on here (at least for a little bit).

"And even though I’m scared, I’ve decided that I owe it to the me-of-3-years-ago to be brave and share my story so that it might help someone with theirs.”

Once again, if you or someone you know is in crisis, please reach out for help and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Featured image credit: PictureLux / The Hollywood Archive / Alamy