Derek Chauvin seeks new trial as the media 'glorified Floyd and demonized' him

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By Asiya Ali

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Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis officer convicted of George Floyd's murder, is seeking a new trial.

As per the New York Post, Chauvin's attorney, William Mohrman, argued in an 82-page brief that Chauvin couldn't get a fair trial in Minneapolis because of the climate surrounding the proceedings and pre-trial publicity outside the courtroom.

According to his attorney, the media coverage "glorified" Floyd and "demonized" Chauvin. He also claims that the jurors were concerned for their safety and the possible consequences that could've occurred if his client was acquitted.

The appeal filing says that if the conviction is upheld, then the court should reduce Chauvin's sentence within the state's sentencing guidelines.

Floyd's final moments were captured by bystanders and body cameras. Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes. The late 46-year-old could be heard repeatedly saying, "I can't breathe" to the officers.

Nationwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice were ignited after Floyd's death.

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Protest against police brutality following the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in New York City. Credit: Christopher Penler / Alamy Photo

The brief from Chauvin's legal team states: “Juror No. 87 stated that she was ‘nervous’ because this was a high profile case and Minneapolis ‘blew up after the incident.'”

It continued: “Juror 28 stated 'the decision the jury makes has maybe broader implications, reactions from the general public,’ and ‘knowing that the people, general public, is paying attention to the decision and more pressure, I guess, to get it right.'”

Chauvin's lawyers also argued that the trial should've been moved outside Hennepin County, saying the court proceedings were "so pervaded by error, misconduct, and prejudice that they were structurally defective."

The 46-year-old ex-cop was convicted in April 2021 for second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. Chauvin was then sentenced to 22.5 years in prison.

The other three former Minneapolis officers accused of culpability in Floyd's death - Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J. Alexander Kueng - are scheduled to stand trial.

In February, Thao, Lane and Kueng were convicted of violating Floyd's civil rights in a separate trial in federal court.

At the time of Chauvin's sentencing, Judge Peter Cahill wrote in a 22-page memorandum that two aggravating factors warranted a harsher sentence.

Firstly, the ex-officer "abused his position of trust and authority" and treated Floyd with "particular cruelty" and "without respect and denied him the dignity owed to all human beings."

Featured image credit: ZUMA Press, Inc. / Alamy Photo

Derek Chauvin seeks new trial as the media 'glorified Floyd and demonized' him

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis officer convicted of George Floyd's murder, is seeking a new trial.

As per the New York Post, Chauvin's attorney, William Mohrman, argued in an 82-page brief that Chauvin couldn't get a fair trial in Minneapolis because of the climate surrounding the proceedings and pre-trial publicity outside the courtroom.

According to his attorney, the media coverage "glorified" Floyd and "demonized" Chauvin. He also claims that the jurors were concerned for their safety and the possible consequences that could've occurred if his client was acquitted.

The appeal filing says that if the conviction is upheld, then the court should reduce Chauvin's sentence within the state's sentencing guidelines.

Floyd's final moments were captured by bystanders and body cameras. Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes. The late 46-year-old could be heard repeatedly saying, "I can't breathe" to the officers.

Nationwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice were ignited after Floyd's death.

wp-image-1263152749
Protest against police brutality following the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in New York City. Credit: Christopher Penler / Alamy Photo

The brief from Chauvin's legal team states: “Juror No. 87 stated that she was ‘nervous’ because this was a high profile case and Minneapolis ‘blew up after the incident.'”

It continued: “Juror 28 stated 'the decision the jury makes has maybe broader implications, reactions from the general public,’ and ‘knowing that the people, general public, is paying attention to the decision and more pressure, I guess, to get it right.'”

Chauvin's lawyers also argued that the trial should've been moved outside Hennepin County, saying the court proceedings were "so pervaded by error, misconduct, and prejudice that they were structurally defective."

The 46-year-old ex-cop was convicted in April 2021 for second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. Chauvin was then sentenced to 22.5 years in prison.

The other three former Minneapolis officers accused of culpability in Floyd's death - Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J. Alexander Kueng - are scheduled to stand trial.

In February, Thao, Lane and Kueng were convicted of violating Floyd's civil rights in a separate trial in federal court.

At the time of Chauvin's sentencing, Judge Peter Cahill wrote in a 22-page memorandum that two aggravating factors warranted a harsher sentence.

Firstly, the ex-officer "abused his position of trust and authority" and treated Floyd with "particular cruelty" and "without respect and denied him the dignity owed to all human beings."

Featured image credit: ZUMA Press, Inc. / Alamy Photo