'Dream Weaver' singer Gary Wright dies aged 80

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

The music industry has been dealt a heartbreaking blow as Gary Wright, the voice behind chart-toppers 'Dream Weaver' and 'Love is Alive', has died at the age of 80.

Dorian, his son, confirmed this news to the Guardian, while Justin, another son, shared with TMZ that Gary had been battling both Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Over the past year, the symptoms intensified, hampering his ability to speak and move.

With a career spanning decades, Wright isn't just known for his singles which claimed the No 2 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. As a versatile artist, he wore many hats: a songwriter, composer, and a frequent collaborator with Beatles legend George Harrison.

Born in 1943 in New Jersey, the multifaceted Wright wasn’t always inclined towards music. He dabbled in acting during his youth, gracing the Broadway stage with his performance in the musical Fanny in 1954 and making appearances on popular shows like The Ed Sullivan Show.

size-full wp-image-1263227064
Credit: Slaven Vlasic / Getty

After pursuing music in high school, Wright shifted his gaze to medicine. Training in the US and West Germany, he soon, however, heeded his true calling and took a deep dive into the world of music.

Gary's notable accomplishments include becoming the joint lead vocalist for British blues rock sensation Spooky Tooth in 1967 and launching his solo journey in 1970. That same year, he contributed to Harrison’s acclaimed album, All Things Must Pass.

The two shared more than just music – they bonded over Indian spirituality and a shared love of music. Their bond was such that Wright described Harrison as "my spiritual mentor".

1975 brought The Dream Weaver, an album directly inspired by his India trip with Harrison. This trailblazing record, rich with synthesizers, spotlighted his prowess. Wright, always the pioneer, was known for live performances on the then-novel portable keyboards and the keytar.

The subsequent decades saw Wright reducing his tours to prioritize family, yet his musical influence was undiminished. Artists like Jay-Z, Tone-Loc, and Eminem celebrated his legacy by incorporating samples of his work. The 90s also witnessed Wright's Dream Weaver get a fresh lease of life in the hit movie Wayne's World.

Paying homage to the departed soul, musician Stephen Bishop fondly remembered his "dear friend" Gary. Bishop's heartfelt note mentioned, "Gary’s vibrant personality and exceptional talent made every moment together truly enjoyable. His legacy will live on for many years to come."

Al Stewart, another contemporary and friend of Wright, expressed his condolences, recounting the times Gary introduced him to his touring band, The Empty Pockets.

The legacy of Gary Wright, a colossus in the music realm, lives on through his melodies and the memories he created. He is survived by his second wife, Rose, his first wife, Tina, and their sons.

Our thoughts are with his loved ones during this difficult time.

Featured image credit: Paul Natkin / Getty

'Dream Weaver' singer Gary Wright dies aged 80

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

The music industry has been dealt a heartbreaking blow as Gary Wright, the voice behind chart-toppers 'Dream Weaver' and 'Love is Alive', has died at the age of 80.

Dorian, his son, confirmed this news to the Guardian, while Justin, another son, shared with TMZ that Gary had been battling both Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Over the past year, the symptoms intensified, hampering his ability to speak and move.

With a career spanning decades, Wright isn't just known for his singles which claimed the No 2 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. As a versatile artist, he wore many hats: a songwriter, composer, and a frequent collaborator with Beatles legend George Harrison.

Born in 1943 in New Jersey, the multifaceted Wright wasn’t always inclined towards music. He dabbled in acting during his youth, gracing the Broadway stage with his performance in the musical Fanny in 1954 and making appearances on popular shows like The Ed Sullivan Show.

size-full wp-image-1263227064
Credit: Slaven Vlasic / Getty

After pursuing music in high school, Wright shifted his gaze to medicine. Training in the US and West Germany, he soon, however, heeded his true calling and took a deep dive into the world of music.

Gary's notable accomplishments include becoming the joint lead vocalist for British blues rock sensation Spooky Tooth in 1967 and launching his solo journey in 1970. That same year, he contributed to Harrison’s acclaimed album, All Things Must Pass.

The two shared more than just music – they bonded over Indian spirituality and a shared love of music. Their bond was such that Wright described Harrison as "my spiritual mentor".

1975 brought The Dream Weaver, an album directly inspired by his India trip with Harrison. This trailblazing record, rich with synthesizers, spotlighted his prowess. Wright, always the pioneer, was known for live performances on the then-novel portable keyboards and the keytar.

The subsequent decades saw Wright reducing his tours to prioritize family, yet his musical influence was undiminished. Artists like Jay-Z, Tone-Loc, and Eminem celebrated his legacy by incorporating samples of his work. The 90s also witnessed Wright's Dream Weaver get a fresh lease of life in the hit movie Wayne's World.

Paying homage to the departed soul, musician Stephen Bishop fondly remembered his "dear friend" Gary. Bishop's heartfelt note mentioned, "Gary’s vibrant personality and exceptional talent made every moment together truly enjoyable. His legacy will live on for many years to come."

Al Stewart, another contemporary and friend of Wright, expressed his condolences, recounting the times Gary introduced him to his touring band, The Empty Pockets.

The legacy of Gary Wright, a colossus in the music realm, lives on through his melodies and the memories he created. He is survived by his second wife, Rose, his first wife, Tina, and their sons.

Our thoughts are with his loved ones during this difficult time.

Featured image credit: Paul Natkin / Getty