News reporter is publicly forced to leave execution because of 'too short' skirt

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By Carina Murphy

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A news reporter has taken to Twitter to slam the Alabama Department of Corrections after they asked her to leave an execution viewing due to the length of her skirt.

Ivana Hrynkiw- a reporter and managing producer with AL.com - explained that she was attempting to watch the execution of death row inmate Joe Nathan James Jr at the William C. Holman Correctional Facility when an ADOC representative reprimanded her over her attire.

"Tonight, a representative of the Alabama Department of Corrections told me publicly I couldn't view the execution because my skirt was too short," she wrote.

"At 5'7", and 5'10" with my heels on, I am a tall and long-legged person. I tried to pull my skirt to my hips to make the skirt longer, but was told it was still not appropriate," Hrynkiw continued.

She explained how a photographer offered her his rain gear - a pair of fisherman's waders - which she slipped into. However, the representative then took issue with her open-toe heels, saying they were too revealing and forcing her to change into a pair of tennis shoes she had in her car.

"Despite wearing waders from a man I have never met and casual tennis shoes, I continued to do my job. I felt embarrassed to have my body and my clothes questioned in front of a room of people I mostly had never met," Hrynkiw wrote. "I sat down, tried to stop blushing, and did my work. As women often have to."

Since sharing the story, Hrynkiw has received a response from ADOC Public Information Officer Kelly Betts, who sent her a link to the official dress code per Lad Bible.

"All dresses, skirts, and pants shall extend below the knee (females only)," the code states. It also explains that prohibited shoes included "slippers, shower shoes, and beach shoes".

Betts also released a statement following the incident, saying: "The Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) has an administrative regulation regarding visitation to any ADOC facility. Within this regulation there is a dress code for all visitors including reporters covering executions. All administrative regulations are posted on the ADOC website."

"The wardens of each ADOC facility enforce this dress code based on each event and current safety conditions. It will be the policy of ADOC in the future to remind all members of the media about this dress code before any media event taking place at an ADOC facility," the statement added.

It concluded by apologizing to Hrynkiw for "any confusion or inconvenience this regulation may have caused."

"We hope by including it in future media advisories, we can avoid this kind of situation," it read.

Featured Image Credit: RUBEN RAMOS / Alamy

News reporter is publicly forced to leave execution because of 'too short' skirt

vt-author-image

By Carina Murphy

Article saved!Article saved!

A news reporter has taken to Twitter to slam the Alabama Department of Corrections after they asked her to leave an execution viewing due to the length of her skirt.

Ivana Hrynkiw- a reporter and managing producer with AL.com - explained that she was attempting to watch the execution of death row inmate Joe Nathan James Jr at the William C. Holman Correctional Facility when an ADOC representative reprimanded her over her attire.

"Tonight, a representative of the Alabama Department of Corrections told me publicly I couldn't view the execution because my skirt was too short," she wrote.

"At 5'7", and 5'10" with my heels on, I am a tall and long-legged person. I tried to pull my skirt to my hips to make the skirt longer, but was told it was still not appropriate," Hrynkiw continued.

She explained how a photographer offered her his rain gear - a pair of fisherman's waders - which she slipped into. However, the representative then took issue with her open-toe heels, saying they were too revealing and forcing her to change into a pair of tennis shoes she had in her car.

"Despite wearing waders from a man I have never met and casual tennis shoes, I continued to do my job. I felt embarrassed to have my body and my clothes questioned in front of a room of people I mostly had never met," Hrynkiw wrote. "I sat down, tried to stop blushing, and did my work. As women often have to."

Since sharing the story, Hrynkiw has received a response from ADOC Public Information Officer Kelly Betts, who sent her a link to the official dress code per Lad Bible.

"All dresses, skirts, and pants shall extend below the knee (females only)," the code states. It also explains that prohibited shoes included "slippers, shower shoes, and beach shoes".

Betts also released a statement following the incident, saying: "The Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) has an administrative regulation regarding visitation to any ADOC facility. Within this regulation there is a dress code for all visitors including reporters covering executions. All administrative regulations are posted on the ADOC website."

"The wardens of each ADOC facility enforce this dress code based on each event and current safety conditions. It will be the policy of ADOC in the future to remind all members of the media about this dress code before any media event taking place at an ADOC facility," the statement added.

It concluded by apologizing to Hrynkiw for "any confusion or inconvenience this regulation may have caused."

"We hope by including it in future media advisories, we can avoid this kind of situation," it read.

Featured Image Credit: RUBEN RAMOS / Alamy