Queen's coffin begins its journey to Windsor Castle

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By Phoebe Egoroff

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The Queen's coffin has embarked on its latest journey on the day of her state funeral.

News of the late Queen's passing on Thursday, September 8, shocked the nation - and the world.

During her 70-year reign, Britain's longest-serving monarch saw three generations, welcomed 15 Prime Ministers, and visited at least 117 countries.

The Queen's coffin was lying-in-state for four full days at Westminster Hall, with mourners allowed to pay their respects to the late monarch for 23 hours a day. Throngs of people gathered in lengthy queues that stretched for up to seven miles, waiting for hours upon hours to say their final goodbyes to the Queen, affectionately known by her late husband as 'Lilibet'.

Just before 06:30AM this morning, Britain's last mourners were able to say their final goodbyes, before the period came to an end. An estimated 300,000 people visited Westminster Hall during these few days.

At 08:00AM, the doors of Westminster Abbey were opened to allow for the congregation attending the state funeral - the first since Winston Churchill's in 1965 almost 60 years ago - to take their places.

Various international heads of state - including US President, Joe Biden, and French President, Emmanuel Macron - as well as foreign royalty were in attendance for the service, which commenced at 11:00AM.

Dr David Hoyle, the dean of Westminster, led the service and a sermon was given by the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. As the service concluded, The Last Post was played, and this was followed by a two-minute silence.

The Queen's coffin was then part of a procession that made its way to Wellington Arch, just 1.5 miles away from Westminster Abbey. Followed by the new reigning monarch, King Charles III, this procession included representatives from the Nation Health Service and members of the armed forces of the Commonwealth.

During each minute of the procession, which took around 45 minutes, guns were fired in Hyde Park by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, and Big Ben's bells were heard tolling. In total, Big Ben tolled 96 times today - one for each year of Her Majesty's life.

Now, the Queen's coffin has been transferred to a hearse, where the late monarch will make her final journey of the day - approximately two hours - to Windsor Castle.

As the hearse left Wellington Arch, crowds cheers and applauded.

At 7:30PM this evening, King Charles III and members of the Royal Family will gather with their beloved Queen just one final time in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle for a private burial service led by the dean of Windsor, David Conner.

It is there that Queen Elizabeth II will finally be laid to rest - after 70 years of service to her country - alongside her husband, Prince Philip, and her parents King George VI and the Queen Mother.

A 73-year-old King Charles III, the late Queen's eldest child, ascended to the throne upon her death.

With a mother whose long life was marked by her overwhelming sense of duty, he surely has large boots to fill. His second wife, Camilla, was made Queen Consort, and Prince William took his father's place as the new Prince of Wales.

Featured image credit: BBC

Queen's coffin begins its journey to Windsor Castle

vt-author-image

By Phoebe Egoroff

Article saved!Article saved!

The Queen's coffin has embarked on its latest journey on the day of her state funeral.

News of the late Queen's passing on Thursday, September 8, shocked the nation - and the world.

During her 70-year reign, Britain's longest-serving monarch saw three generations, welcomed 15 Prime Ministers, and visited at least 117 countries.

The Queen's coffin was lying-in-state for four full days at Westminster Hall, with mourners allowed to pay their respects to the late monarch for 23 hours a day. Throngs of people gathered in lengthy queues that stretched for up to seven miles, waiting for hours upon hours to say their final goodbyes to the Queen, affectionately known by her late husband as 'Lilibet'.

Just before 06:30AM this morning, Britain's last mourners were able to say their final goodbyes, before the period came to an end. An estimated 300,000 people visited Westminster Hall during these few days.

At 08:00AM, the doors of Westminster Abbey were opened to allow for the congregation attending the state funeral - the first since Winston Churchill's in 1965 almost 60 years ago - to take their places.

Various international heads of state - including US President, Joe Biden, and French President, Emmanuel Macron - as well as foreign royalty were in attendance for the service, which commenced at 11:00AM.

Dr David Hoyle, the dean of Westminster, led the service and a sermon was given by the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. As the service concluded, The Last Post was played, and this was followed by a two-minute silence.

The Queen's coffin was then part of a procession that made its way to Wellington Arch, just 1.5 miles away from Westminster Abbey. Followed by the new reigning monarch, King Charles III, this procession included representatives from the Nation Health Service and members of the armed forces of the Commonwealth.

During each minute of the procession, which took around 45 minutes, guns were fired in Hyde Park by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, and Big Ben's bells were heard tolling. In total, Big Ben tolled 96 times today - one for each year of Her Majesty's life.

Now, the Queen's coffin has been transferred to a hearse, where the late monarch will make her final journey of the day - approximately two hours - to Windsor Castle.

As the hearse left Wellington Arch, crowds cheers and applauded.

At 7:30PM this evening, King Charles III and members of the Royal Family will gather with their beloved Queen just one final time in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle for a private burial service led by the dean of Windsor, David Conner.

It is there that Queen Elizabeth II will finally be laid to rest - after 70 years of service to her country - alongside her husband, Prince Philip, and her parents King George VI and the Queen Mother.

A 73-year-old King Charles III, the late Queen's eldest child, ascended to the throne upon her death.

With a mother whose long life was marked by her overwhelming sense of duty, he surely has large boots to fill. His second wife, Camilla, was made Queen Consort, and Prince William took his father's place as the new Prince of Wales.

Featured image credit: BBC