Royal guard collapses near Queen's coffin prompting BBC to suspend live footage

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By Asiya Ali

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BBC News suspended live streaming after one of the royal guards watching over the Queen’s coffin at Westminster Hall suddenly collapsed.

Around 1:00 AM on Thursday morning, a black-clad royal guard was holding a ceremonial staff when he appeared to faint.

The guard was standing at the foot of the late Queen's casket when he suddenly fell to the floor, with officials quickly rushing to his aid.

The incident caused the media giant to suspend the live stream of the lying-in-state on YouTube, and instead showed an exterior of the building.

Watch the moment below:

The collapse happened on the first night of Queen Elizabeth II's 24-hour vigil which allows the public to pay their respects to the late monarch until her state funeral on Monday, September 19.

The guards from units, Sovereign’s Bodyguard, the Household Division, and Yeoman Warders of the Tower of London are in charge of maintaining a 24/7 security service around the Queen’s coffin.

During the service, the soldiers - dressed in ceremonial uniforms -  are required to rotate every 20 minutes around the four corners of the catafalque. They are also expected to remain still and firm while standing for around six hours.

According to the Evening Standard, over an hour after the royal guard was tended to, the BBC broadcast had not returned to the scene inside the hall.

Meanwhile, the incident drew concern from those watching on social media. Many suspected that the long hours of standing was the reason for the royal guard's collapse.

One user wrote: "Standing at attention requires their knees to lock, causing a stoppage of blood flow and adequate circulation and can cause fainting."

While another shared: "Pretty grim, he staggered a few times just before it happened as well - he'll be lucky not to have seriously injured his face, hitting the floor that hard."

Thousands of mourners have joined miles-long queues from Wednesday (September 14) night to pay their respects to Her Majesty as she lies in state at Westminster Hall - which is open 24 hours a day.

According to officials, they expect as many as 750,000 people will view the late Queen's coffin before the lying in state concludes at 6:30AM on Monday.

Also, as reported by the Independent, a rehearsal for Queen Elizabeth II's state funeral procession is scheduled to take place on Thursday (September 15).

Featured image credit: PA Images / Alamy

Royal guard collapses near Queen's coffin prompting BBC to suspend live footage

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

BBC News suspended live streaming after one of the royal guards watching over the Queen’s coffin at Westminster Hall suddenly collapsed.

Around 1:00 AM on Thursday morning, a black-clad royal guard was holding a ceremonial staff when he appeared to faint.

The guard was standing at the foot of the late Queen's casket when he suddenly fell to the floor, with officials quickly rushing to his aid.

The incident caused the media giant to suspend the live stream of the lying-in-state on YouTube, and instead showed an exterior of the building.

Watch the moment below:

The collapse happened on the first night of Queen Elizabeth II's 24-hour vigil which allows the public to pay their respects to the late monarch until her state funeral on Monday, September 19.

The guards from units, Sovereign’s Bodyguard, the Household Division, and Yeoman Warders of the Tower of London are in charge of maintaining a 24/7 security service around the Queen’s coffin.

During the service, the soldiers - dressed in ceremonial uniforms -  are required to rotate every 20 minutes around the four corners of the catafalque. They are also expected to remain still and firm while standing for around six hours.

According to the Evening Standard, over an hour after the royal guard was tended to, the BBC broadcast had not returned to the scene inside the hall.

Meanwhile, the incident drew concern from those watching on social media. Many suspected that the long hours of standing was the reason for the royal guard's collapse.

One user wrote: "Standing at attention requires their knees to lock, causing a stoppage of blood flow and adequate circulation and can cause fainting."

While another shared: "Pretty grim, he staggered a few times just before it happened as well - he'll be lucky not to have seriously injured his face, hitting the floor that hard."

Thousands of mourners have joined miles-long queues from Wednesday (September 14) night to pay their respects to Her Majesty as she lies in state at Westminster Hall - which is open 24 hours a day.

According to officials, they expect as many as 750,000 people will view the late Queen's coffin before the lying in state concludes at 6:30AM on Monday.

Also, as reported by the Independent, a rehearsal for Queen Elizabeth II's state funeral procession is scheduled to take place on Thursday (September 15).

Featured image credit: PA Images / Alamy