King Charles shares unsettling side-effect amid cancer treatment

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By Nasima Khatun

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King Charles has recently shared an unsettling side-effect of his cancer treatment.

The British Royal, who announced his cancer diagnosis back in February, gave a rare insight into his ongoing health battle while he attended a recent event at the Army Aviation Centre in Hampshire in the United Kingdom.

The prestigious event saw the King hand over his Army Air Corps role to his eldest son, Prince William after becoming colonel-in-chief 32 years ago.

"The great thing is he's a very good pilot indeed," King Charles joked as per a report by the BBC.

Credit: Mark Cuthbert/UK Press/Getty

While at the event, both royals met with other British army veterans including Aaron Mapplebeck, who is also a cancer survivor.

The Independent reported that when Mapplebeck said he had lost his sense of taste during chemotherapy for testicular cancer last year, the King said this had also happened to him during his own treatment journey.

It has not yet been revealed what specific type of cancer the 75-year-old has, but the pair seemingly bonded over their similar side effects during their respective health battles.

Credit: Mark Cuthbert/UK Press/Getty

It comes just over two months after the monarch announced that he is undergoing treatment for cancer following its discovery during a procedure for an enlarged prostate.

In a statement, Buckingham Palace later clarified that the cancer was not prostate cancer.

"During The King’s recent hospital procedure for benign prostate enlargement, a separate issue of concern was noted. Subsequent diagnostic tests have identified a form of cancer," a spokesperson for the palace wrote. "His Majesty has today commenced a schedule of regular treatments, during which time he has been advised by doctors to postpone public-facing duties. Throughout this period, His Majesty will continue to undertake State business and official paperwork as usual."

Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty

The statement went on to thank his medical team and "their swift intervention" before adding: "He remains wholly positive about his treatment and looks forward to returning to full public duty as soon as possible."

The message concluded with: "His Majesty has chosen to share his diagnosis to prevent speculation and in the hope it may assist public understanding for all those around the world who are affected by cancer."

Credit: Stringer/Anadolu/Getty

In a follow-up statement released by Buckingham Palace, the King thanked the public for their well-wishes during this difficult period.

“I would like to express my most heartfelt thanks for the many messages of support and good wishes I have received in recent days,” he said in the message posted on Feb 10. “As all those who have been affected by cancer will know, such kind thoughts are the greatest comfort and encouragement.”

Our thoughts and prayers are with the King during his time and we wish him all the best with his treatment.

Featured Image Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty

King Charles shares unsettling side-effect amid cancer treatment

vt-author-image

By Nasima Khatun

Article saved!Article saved!

King Charles has recently shared an unsettling side-effect of his cancer treatment.

The British Royal, who announced his cancer diagnosis back in February, gave a rare insight into his ongoing health battle while he attended a recent event at the Army Aviation Centre in Hampshire in the United Kingdom.

The prestigious event saw the King hand over his Army Air Corps role to his eldest son, Prince William after becoming colonel-in-chief 32 years ago.

"The great thing is he's a very good pilot indeed," King Charles joked as per a report by the BBC.

Credit: Mark Cuthbert/UK Press/Getty

While at the event, both royals met with other British army veterans including Aaron Mapplebeck, who is also a cancer survivor.

The Independent reported that when Mapplebeck said he had lost his sense of taste during chemotherapy for testicular cancer last year, the King said this had also happened to him during his own treatment journey.

It has not yet been revealed what specific type of cancer the 75-year-old has, but the pair seemingly bonded over their similar side effects during their respective health battles.

Credit: Mark Cuthbert/UK Press/Getty

It comes just over two months after the monarch announced that he is undergoing treatment for cancer following its discovery during a procedure for an enlarged prostate.

In a statement, Buckingham Palace later clarified that the cancer was not prostate cancer.

"During The King’s recent hospital procedure for benign prostate enlargement, a separate issue of concern was noted. Subsequent diagnostic tests have identified a form of cancer," a spokesperson for the palace wrote. "His Majesty has today commenced a schedule of regular treatments, during which time he has been advised by doctors to postpone public-facing duties. Throughout this period, His Majesty will continue to undertake State business and official paperwork as usual."

Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty

The statement went on to thank his medical team and "their swift intervention" before adding: "He remains wholly positive about his treatment and looks forward to returning to full public duty as soon as possible."

The message concluded with: "His Majesty has chosen to share his diagnosis to prevent speculation and in the hope it may assist public understanding for all those around the world who are affected by cancer."

Credit: Stringer/Anadolu/Getty

In a follow-up statement released by Buckingham Palace, the King thanked the public for their well-wishes during this difficult period.

“I would like to express my most heartfelt thanks for the many messages of support and good wishes I have received in recent days,” he said in the message posted on Feb 10. “As all those who have been affected by cancer will know, such kind thoughts are the greatest comfort and encouragement.”

Our thoughts and prayers are with the King during his time and we wish him all the best with his treatment.

Featured Image Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty