Almost 70 percent of Americans are okay with a gay presidential candidate, poll finds

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By VT

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In a crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates, Pete Buttigieg, pronounced boot-edge-edge, has a lot of momentum. He's a former Naval Intelligence Officer who served seven months in Afghanistan, the two-term mayor of South Bend, Indiana and, oh yeah, an openly gay Christian, who married his husband, Chasten, last June. In the first fundraising quarter, the 37-year-old raised $7 million, making him a significant contender.

Buttigieg is the second openly gay presidential candidate in American history, the first being Republican Fred Karger, who ran a long-shot campaign during the 2012 primary. So far, the millennial's sexuality has not been a liability, showing how much America's social attitudes have changed.

In 2006, when Buttigieg was 24, 34% of Americans said they would be "very uncomfortable" with a gay person running for president, according to an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll. Meanwhile, 19 percent of Americans said they had "reservations," 28 percent said they'd be "comfortable" and only five percent said they be "enthusiastic."

Almost 70 percent of Americans are okay with a gay presidential candidate, poll finds

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

In a crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates, Pete Buttigieg, pronounced boot-edge-edge, has a lot of momentum. He's a former Naval Intelligence Officer who served seven months in Afghanistan, the two-term mayor of South Bend, Indiana and, oh yeah, an openly gay Christian, who married his husband, Chasten, last June. In the first fundraising quarter, the 37-year-old raised $7 million, making him a significant contender.

Buttigieg is the second openly gay presidential candidate in American history, the first being Republican Fred Karger, who ran a long-shot campaign during the 2012 primary. So far, the millennial's sexuality has not been a liability, showing how much America's social attitudes have changed.

In 2006, when Buttigieg was 24, 34% of Americans said they would be "very uncomfortable" with a gay person running for president, according to an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll. Meanwhile, 19 percent of Americans said they had "reservations," 28 percent said they'd be "comfortable" and only five percent said they be "enthusiastic."