Daniel Penny pleads not guilty to killing Jordan Neely on NYC Subway

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

Marine veteran Daniel Penny has pleaded not guilty to second-degree manslaughter in relation to the death of Jordan Neely.

Penny facing charges for his alleged involvement in the chokehold death of 30-year-old Neely on a New York City subway, and has maintained his innocence on Wednesday, per Forbes.

This high-profile case - which has been ruled as a homicide by the New York City medical examiner’s office - has stoked considerable controversy and debate across the city and the nation.

The 24-year-old Penny, who was indicted by a New York grand jury earlier this month, entered his plea in Manhattan's New York Supreme Court. It comes after Penny voluntarily surrendered to New York City authorities and was subsequently released on a $100,000 bond.

size-full wp-image-1263218456
Daniel Penny leaves the courtroom after an arraignment hearing at NYS Supreme Court on June 28. Credit: Credit: Michael M. Santiago / Getty

If found guilty, he faces a potential prison sentence of five to 15 years.

The fatal incident took place last month when Penny allegedly held Neely in a chokehold on a northbound F train.

Video footage that emerged showed Penny bringing Neely to the floor of the train in a rear chokehold, an act that sparked widespread protests across the city. The public outcry focused not only on justice for Neely's family but also spotlighted the racial dimensions of the incident, as Penny is white, and Neely was Black.

Neely, known for his performances on New York subways as a Michael Jackson impersonator, had a documented history of mental health struggles and had been arrested over 40 times for various charges, including trespassing, theft, and unprovoked assault.

Penny's attorneys, Thomas Kenniff and Steven Raiser, argue that Penny never intended to harm Neely. Instead, they assert that Neely had been "aggressively threatening" subway passengers, including Penny himself.

Speaking to Fox News Digital, 24-year-old Penny said he felt he needed to take action Neely began behaving erratically on an F train in Lower Manhattan .

"If he had carried out his threats, he would have killed somebody," Penny told the outlet of the troubled street performer.

The case has triggered strong reactions from political figures, with right-wing pundits and GOP lawmakers criticizing the charges against Penny.

Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) and Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) characterized the legal proceedings as emblematic of the "woke" criminal justice system. Representative Ronny Jackson (R-Tx.) tweeted that Penny "did nothing wrong," labeling Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg a "disgrace to this country."

Democrats, in contrast, have called for justice for Neely. Notably, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) criticized the delay in charging Penny, describing it as "disgusting."

A crowdfunding campaign to support Penny's legal defense has gained momentum, raising over $1.5 million in the initial two days following his charge. The donation page, managed by the law firm Raiser & Kenniff, P.C., has since collected over $2.9 million as of June 28.

Featured image credit: Michael M. Santiago / Getty

Daniel Penny pleads not guilty to killing Jordan Neely on NYC Subway

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

Marine veteran Daniel Penny has pleaded not guilty to second-degree manslaughter in relation to the death of Jordan Neely.

Penny facing charges for his alleged involvement in the chokehold death of 30-year-old Neely on a New York City subway, and has maintained his innocence on Wednesday, per Forbes.

This high-profile case - which has been ruled as a homicide by the New York City medical examiner’s office - has stoked considerable controversy and debate across the city and the nation.

The 24-year-old Penny, who was indicted by a New York grand jury earlier this month, entered his plea in Manhattan's New York Supreme Court. It comes after Penny voluntarily surrendered to New York City authorities and was subsequently released on a $100,000 bond.

size-full wp-image-1263218456
Daniel Penny leaves the courtroom after an arraignment hearing at NYS Supreme Court on June 28. Credit: Credit: Michael M. Santiago / Getty

If found guilty, he faces a potential prison sentence of five to 15 years.

The fatal incident took place last month when Penny allegedly held Neely in a chokehold on a northbound F train.

Video footage that emerged showed Penny bringing Neely to the floor of the train in a rear chokehold, an act that sparked widespread protests across the city. The public outcry focused not only on justice for Neely's family but also spotlighted the racial dimensions of the incident, as Penny is white, and Neely was Black.

Neely, known for his performances on New York subways as a Michael Jackson impersonator, had a documented history of mental health struggles and had been arrested over 40 times for various charges, including trespassing, theft, and unprovoked assault.

Penny's attorneys, Thomas Kenniff and Steven Raiser, argue that Penny never intended to harm Neely. Instead, they assert that Neely had been "aggressively threatening" subway passengers, including Penny himself.

Speaking to Fox News Digital, 24-year-old Penny said he felt he needed to take action Neely began behaving erratically on an F train in Lower Manhattan .

"If he had carried out his threats, he would have killed somebody," Penny told the outlet of the troubled street performer.

The case has triggered strong reactions from political figures, with right-wing pundits and GOP lawmakers criticizing the charges against Penny.

Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) and Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) characterized the legal proceedings as emblematic of the "woke" criminal justice system. Representative Ronny Jackson (R-Tx.) tweeted that Penny "did nothing wrong," labeling Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg a "disgrace to this country."

Democrats, in contrast, have called for justice for Neely. Notably, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) criticized the delay in charging Penny, describing it as "disgusting."

A crowdfunding campaign to support Penny's legal defense has gained momentum, raising over $1.5 million in the initial two days following his charge. The donation page, managed by the law firm Raiser & Kenniff, P.C., has since collected over $2.9 million as of June 28.

Featured image credit: Michael M. Santiago / Getty