Family of mom who died after drinking too much water speaks out

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By Asiya Ali

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The family of a woman who tragically died after drinking too much water in twenty minutes has spoken out about their sudden loss.

Ashley Summers had been celebrating the Fourth of July weekend at Indiana’s Lake Freeman with her husband Cody Summers, and her two daughters, Brooklyn and Brynlee, when she began feeling unwell.

Amid the celebrations, the 35-year-old said that she was feeling extremely dehydrated and severely light-headed, so she decided to drink water, but that did not relieve her symptoms. She consumed the equivalent of four 16oz bottles within the space of just twenty minutes, per WRTV.

Speaking to The Messenger, her uncle Deon Miller said: "It was really hot, and they were out on the water. She had a headache and felt really thirsty," adding, "She thought she must have been dehydrated, so she drank like four bottled waters in half an hour."

Tragedy struck when the mother-of-two returned home with her family and ended up collapsing out in the garage. Her husband desperately fought to save her life by performing CPR and then rushed her to Indiana University Health Arnett Hospital.

"Cody gave her CPR and got her going a little bit, but by the time they got to the hospital and ran tests and everything, they had to put her on the ventilator," Deon said. "By that time, her brain had swelled enough that it shut all circulation off to her brain, and she was brain dead."

Unfortunately, the stricken woman never regained consciousness and doctors had to break the heartbreaking news to her family that she had tragically passed away from water toxicity.

Summers' brother Devon Miller told the outlet that the family is crushed by the loss, saying: "My sister, Holly, called me, and she was just an absolute wreck."

"She was like, 'Ashley is in the hospital. She has brain swelling, they don't know what's causing it, they don't know what they can do to get it to go down, and it's not looking good,'" he added.

Recalling the devastating incident, Devon said that someone had informed him that his sister drank "four bottles of water" in 20 minutes.

"I mean, an average water bottle is like 16 ounces (0.4 liters), so that was 64 ounces (1.89 liters) that she drank in a span of 20 minutes," he said. "That's half a gallon. That's what you're supposed to drink in a whole day."

Water toxicity - also known as water poisoning - happens when too much water is ingested quickly, or if the kidneys retain too much water due to underlying health conditions. The symptoms include feeling unwell as well as having headaches, soreness, nausea, and muscle cramps.

The condition also can lead to insufficient salt in the blood, causing an electrolyte abnormality called hyponatremia in severe instances, per the National Library of Medicine. Furthermore, the reduced sodium levels result in exterior cell fluid transiting into cells and causing swelling. In brain cells, this could turn fatal, as cited by The New York Post.

An expert named Alex Ebner, Owner of ACE Medical Company explained to The Mirror how drinking too much water can be deadly.

He said: "According to scientists, a person will only live three days without water," adding: "By staying hydrated, a person can enjoy several important benefits in quality of life: more efficient brain function, higher energy, a healthier cardiovascular system, and fewer aches and pains."

Dr. Blake Froberg with Indiana University Health told WRTV that people - including those who work outside or exercise frequently - should have a hydration plan, especially during the summer.

"Making sure that you're drinking things that have electrolytes, that have some sodium and some potassium," he said.

Summers' family is now issuing a warning to others about drinking too much, with Devon stating: "The warning takeaway that I take from it is ... if I'm thirsty and I drink a bottle of water and I still feel like I haven't got enough, that might be the light bulb for me to go, 'Ok. You know what? I need to drink a Gatorade.'"

The mother was an organ donor and was able to save five lives. There is also a Venmo account set up for her children and medical bills. If you would like to donate, the username is @Cody-Summers-16.

Our thoughts are with her family and friends at this time.

Featured image credit: Vitapix / Getty

Family of mom who died after drinking too much water speaks out

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

The family of a woman who tragically died after drinking too much water in twenty minutes has spoken out about their sudden loss.

Ashley Summers had been celebrating the Fourth of July weekend at Indiana’s Lake Freeman with her husband Cody Summers, and her two daughters, Brooklyn and Brynlee, when she began feeling unwell.

Amid the celebrations, the 35-year-old said that she was feeling extremely dehydrated and severely light-headed, so she decided to drink water, but that did not relieve her symptoms. She consumed the equivalent of four 16oz bottles within the space of just twenty minutes, per WRTV.

Speaking to The Messenger, her uncle Deon Miller said: "It was really hot, and they were out on the water. She had a headache and felt really thirsty," adding, "She thought she must have been dehydrated, so she drank like four bottled waters in half an hour."

Tragedy struck when the mother-of-two returned home with her family and ended up collapsing out in the garage. Her husband desperately fought to save her life by performing CPR and then rushed her to Indiana University Health Arnett Hospital.

"Cody gave her CPR and got her going a little bit, but by the time they got to the hospital and ran tests and everything, they had to put her on the ventilator," Deon said. "By that time, her brain had swelled enough that it shut all circulation off to her brain, and she was brain dead."

Unfortunately, the stricken woman never regained consciousness and doctors had to break the heartbreaking news to her family that she had tragically passed away from water toxicity.

Summers' brother Devon Miller told the outlet that the family is crushed by the loss, saying: "My sister, Holly, called me, and she was just an absolute wreck."

"She was like, 'Ashley is in the hospital. She has brain swelling, they don't know what's causing it, they don't know what they can do to get it to go down, and it's not looking good,'" he added.

Recalling the devastating incident, Devon said that someone had informed him that his sister drank "four bottles of water" in 20 minutes.

"I mean, an average water bottle is like 16 ounces (0.4 liters), so that was 64 ounces (1.89 liters) that she drank in a span of 20 minutes," he said. "That's half a gallon. That's what you're supposed to drink in a whole day."

Water toxicity - also known as water poisoning - happens when too much water is ingested quickly, or if the kidneys retain too much water due to underlying health conditions. The symptoms include feeling unwell as well as having headaches, soreness, nausea, and muscle cramps.

The condition also can lead to insufficient salt in the blood, causing an electrolyte abnormality called hyponatremia in severe instances, per the National Library of Medicine. Furthermore, the reduced sodium levels result in exterior cell fluid transiting into cells and causing swelling. In brain cells, this could turn fatal, as cited by The New York Post.

An expert named Alex Ebner, Owner of ACE Medical Company explained to The Mirror how drinking too much water can be deadly.

He said: "According to scientists, a person will only live three days without water," adding: "By staying hydrated, a person can enjoy several important benefits in quality of life: more efficient brain function, higher energy, a healthier cardiovascular system, and fewer aches and pains."

Dr. Blake Froberg with Indiana University Health told WRTV that people - including those who work outside or exercise frequently - should have a hydration plan, especially during the summer.

"Making sure that you're drinking things that have electrolytes, that have some sodium and some potassium," he said.

Summers' family is now issuing a warning to others about drinking too much, with Devon stating: "The warning takeaway that I take from it is ... if I'm thirsty and I drink a bottle of water and I still feel like I haven't got enough, that might be the light bulb for me to go, 'Ok. You know what? I need to drink a Gatorade.'"

The mother was an organ donor and was able to save five lives. There is also a Venmo account set up for her children and medical bills. If you would like to donate, the username is @Cody-Summers-16.

Our thoughts are with her family and friends at this time.

Featured image credit: Vitapix / Getty