Anonymous claim to have hacked the Kremlin CCTV system, threaten to reveal its secrets

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By VT

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Hacking group Anonymous claims to have successfully hacked the Kremlin's CCTV system and are threatening to release its secrets.

The Anonymous TV Twitter account wrote on April 6: "JUST IN: Hackers ( @Thblckrbbtworld ) who operates in behalf of #Anonymous gained access to the Kremlin CCTV system."

The tweet continued: "They quoted: 'We won't stop until we reveal all of your secrets. You won't be able to stop us. "Now we're inside the castle, Kremlin." #OpRussia #Ukraine.'"

The footage included in the tweet, supposedly surveillance footage of Kremlin staff, is yet to be verified by experts outside of the vigilante cyber collective.

This comes some days after the hacktivist group claimed to have successfully hacked the Central Bank of Russia - and threatened to release delicate files.

The bank, which is also known as the Central Bank of the Russian Federation, is tasked with the responsibility of protecting the Russian ruble, which collapsed after the country declared war on Ukraine in February.

Anonymous shared that they had gained access into the bank's security on March 23 in a tweet posted by one of the group's Twitter accounts, @YourAnonTV.

"JUST IN: The #Anonymous collective has hacked the Central Bank of Russia," read the tweet, which included a graphic of the bank's logo, as well as the Russian flag, and the hacking group's signature anon mask.

They then stated in no uncertain terms that files containing "secret agreements" would be released, writing: "More than 35,000 files will be released within 48 hours with secret agreements. #OpRussia."

These are just some of the many cyber attacks they claimed to have carried out against Russia in recent weeks, in its goal of supporting Ukraine in its conflict with its Putin-led neighbor.

Last month, the group tweeted that they had ramped up their cyber assaults on Russian government websites.

"#Anonymous launching unprecedented attacks on the websites of Russian gov't. Increasing their capacity at peak times from 500 GB earlier, it is now up to 1 TB. That is, two to three times more powerful than the most serious incidents," they wrote.

If you would like to know how you can support the Ukrainian people at this time, click HERE to find a list of organizations and groups dedicated to helping those affected by this crisis.

Featured image credit: Russian Look Ltd. / Alamy

Anonymous claim to have hacked the Kremlin CCTV system, threaten to reveal its secrets

vt-author-image

By VT

Article saved!Article saved!

Hacking group Anonymous claims to have successfully hacked the Kremlin's CCTV system and are threatening to release its secrets.

The Anonymous TV Twitter account wrote on April 6: "JUST IN: Hackers ( @Thblckrbbtworld ) who operates in behalf of #Anonymous gained access to the Kremlin CCTV system."

The tweet continued: "They quoted: 'We won't stop until we reveal all of your secrets. You won't be able to stop us. "Now we're inside the castle, Kremlin." #OpRussia #Ukraine.'"

The footage included in the tweet, supposedly surveillance footage of Kremlin staff, is yet to be verified by experts outside of the vigilante cyber collective.

This comes some days after the hacktivist group claimed to have successfully hacked the Central Bank of Russia - and threatened to release delicate files.

The bank, which is also known as the Central Bank of the Russian Federation, is tasked with the responsibility of protecting the Russian ruble, which collapsed after the country declared war on Ukraine in February.

Anonymous shared that they had gained access into the bank's security on March 23 in a tweet posted by one of the group's Twitter accounts, @YourAnonTV.

"JUST IN: The #Anonymous collective has hacked the Central Bank of Russia," read the tweet, which included a graphic of the bank's logo, as well as the Russian flag, and the hacking group's signature anon mask.

They then stated in no uncertain terms that files containing "secret agreements" would be released, writing: "More than 35,000 files will be released within 48 hours with secret agreements. #OpRussia."

These are just some of the many cyber attacks they claimed to have carried out against Russia in recent weeks, in its goal of supporting Ukraine in its conflict with its Putin-led neighbor.

Last month, the group tweeted that they had ramped up their cyber assaults on Russian government websites.

"#Anonymous launching unprecedented attacks on the websites of Russian gov't. Increasing their capacity at peak times from 500 GB earlier, it is now up to 1 TB. That is, two to three times more powerful than the most serious incidents," they wrote.

If you would like to know how you can support the Ukrainian people at this time, click HERE to find a list of organizations and groups dedicated to helping those affected by this crisis.

Featured image credit: Russian Look Ltd. / Alamy