People are mocking Leonardo DiCaprio's accent in new movie trailer: 'Did Leo just invent a new accent?'

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By Phoebe Egoroff

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Netizens have begun mocking Leonardo DiCaprio's... ahem... unique accent in the latest movie trailer for Killers of the Flower Moon.

Directed by Martin Scorsese - who is best known for movies like Casino, Goodfellas, The Irishman, and The Wolf of Wall Street - the film follows the story of an FBI murder investigation during the 1920s, which was sparked after the mysterious murders of the Native American Osage tribe in Oklahoma.

Lily Gladstone, Jesse Plemons, and Academy Award winners Brendan Fraser and Robert De Niro will star alongside DiCaprio, 48, in the three-and-a-half-hour crime movie.

And while the disturbing subject matter is likely to reignite discussions on America's brutal colonial past, the internet has been more focused on DiCaprio's accent in the trailer, which was released this week.

One person wrote: "Did Leo just invent a new accent, has anybody ever sounded like that?"

Someone else added: "love him but why does scorsese feel the need to inflict leo dicaprio doing a terrible accent on us every decade or so."

"Will watch and im sure it's great but my tolerance for leo dicaprio accent work is wearing," another tweet read.

"my most deeply unfortunate trait is loving any vehicle for leo doing a weird little southern accent," a further hilarious comment said.

"What the f**k is up with that new leo DiCaprio movie? What the hell is that accent he's got? Does he think midwesterners sound like that? Lol so stupid," someone else chimed in, evidently frustrated at the Great Gatsby actor's knowledge of midwestern accents.

"Scorsese and De Niro together maybe for the last time, Leo DiCaprio doing a silly accent. I'm game," a final user said.

DiCaprio - a decorated actor who has appeared in arguably some of the greatest movies of all time - may have acting prowess, but the jury is still out on some of his accents. Many have criticized his South African accent in the 2006 movie Blood Diamond, as well as his "wonky" Irish accent in Gangs of New York, per The Independent.

Aside from the accent drama, Scorsese's latest movie is highly anticipated, and it's set to be his first since 2019's The Irishman, which saw the director go back to his roots in a mob drama starring regular collaborators De Niro and Joe Pesci.

In a recent interview with Deadline, the 80-year-old director was asked how he finds the energy to step back behind the camera and make more movies.

"Got to. Got to. Yeah. I wish I could take a break for eight weeks and make a film at the same time. The whole world has opened up to me, but it's too late. It's too late," he said, before adding: "I'm old. I read stuff. I see things. I want to tell stories, and there's no more time. Kurosawa, when he got his Oscar, when George [Lucas] and Steven [Spielberg] gave it to him, he said, 'I'm only now beginning to see the possibility of what cinema could be, and it's too late.' He was 83. At the time, I said, 'What does he mean?' Now I know what he means."

Featured image credit: Erik Pendzich / Alamy

People are mocking Leonardo DiCaprio's accent in new movie trailer: 'Did Leo just invent a new accent?'

vt-author-image

By Phoebe Egoroff

Article saved!Article saved!

Netizens have begun mocking Leonardo DiCaprio's... ahem... unique accent in the latest movie trailer for Killers of the Flower Moon.

Directed by Martin Scorsese - who is best known for movies like Casino, Goodfellas, The Irishman, and The Wolf of Wall Street - the film follows the story of an FBI murder investigation during the 1920s, which was sparked after the mysterious murders of the Native American Osage tribe in Oklahoma.

Lily Gladstone, Jesse Plemons, and Academy Award winners Brendan Fraser and Robert De Niro will star alongside DiCaprio, 48, in the three-and-a-half-hour crime movie.

And while the disturbing subject matter is likely to reignite discussions on America's brutal colonial past, the internet has been more focused on DiCaprio's accent in the trailer, which was released this week.

One person wrote: "Did Leo just invent a new accent, has anybody ever sounded like that?"

Someone else added: "love him but why does scorsese feel the need to inflict leo dicaprio doing a terrible accent on us every decade or so."

"Will watch and im sure it's great but my tolerance for leo dicaprio accent work is wearing," another tweet read.

"my most deeply unfortunate trait is loving any vehicle for leo doing a weird little southern accent," a further hilarious comment said.

"What the f**k is up with that new leo DiCaprio movie? What the hell is that accent he's got? Does he think midwesterners sound like that? Lol so stupid," someone else chimed in, evidently frustrated at the Great Gatsby actor's knowledge of midwestern accents.

"Scorsese and De Niro together maybe for the last time, Leo DiCaprio doing a silly accent. I'm game," a final user said.

DiCaprio - a decorated actor who has appeared in arguably some of the greatest movies of all time - may have acting prowess, but the jury is still out on some of his accents. Many have criticized his South African accent in the 2006 movie Blood Diamond, as well as his "wonky" Irish accent in Gangs of New York, per The Independent.

Aside from the accent drama, Scorsese's latest movie is highly anticipated, and it's set to be his first since 2019's The Irishman, which saw the director go back to his roots in a mob drama starring regular collaborators De Niro and Joe Pesci.

In a recent interview with Deadline, the 80-year-old director was asked how he finds the energy to step back behind the camera and make more movies.

"Got to. Got to. Yeah. I wish I could take a break for eight weeks and make a film at the same time. The whole world has opened up to me, but it's too late. It's too late," he said, before adding: "I'm old. I read stuff. I see things. I want to tell stories, and there's no more time. Kurosawa, when he got his Oscar, when George [Lucas] and Steven [Spielberg] gave it to him, he said, 'I'm only now beginning to see the possibility of what cinema could be, and it's too late.' He was 83. At the time, I said, 'What does he mean?' Now I know what he means."

Featured image credit: Erik Pendzich / Alamy