Seth Rogen and other celebs speak out in defense of Sha’Carri Richardson

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By stefan armitage

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Following Sha’Carri Richardson's suspension from the 100-meter race at the Tokyo Olympics, celebrities such as Seth Rogen have spoken out in defense of the athlete.

Yesterday, it was announced that Richardson would be suspended from running in the Olympic 100m race in Tokyo, following her testing positive for THC - a chemical found in marijuana.

Richardson - hailed as "America's Fastest Woman" - also had her winning performance at the US Olympic Trials invalidated by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

Prior to the news of her test results being announced, the 21-year-old tweeted on Thursday: "I am human."

After originally qualifying for the Olympic games, Richardson captured the hearts of viewers after she was seen running into the arms of her grandmother. The athlete later revealed to NBC in a post-race interview that she had received the news that her mother had died a week before the event.

She described the loss as "triggering" and "shocking".

Considering that the recreational use of marijuana is legal in many states across the US - and many countries around the world - supporters have taken to social media to call Richardson's suspension "unfair".

One star to speak out in defense of Richardson is actor Seth Rogen - who has long been an outspoken user and advocate for marijuana.

Rogen tweeted alongside a video interview with Richardson: "The notion that weed is a problematic 'drug' is rooted in racism.

"It’s insane that Team USA would disqualify one of this country’s most talented athletes over thinking that’s rooted in hatred. It’s something they should be ashamed of. Also if weed made you fast, I’d be FloJo [80s Olympian Florence Joyner]."

Former American figure skater Adam Rippon also tweeted his support, writing: "My heart is broken for @itskerrii. I think she is an amazing athlete and her personality is superstar level. Marijuana being a banned substance in competition seems… outdated???? And unfair."

Queer Eye star Johnathan Van Ness also tweeted their response, saying: "To punish this incredible athlete for cannabis?? This prohibition has f***ed up so many peoples lives I just can’t even. We love you @itskerrii".

Dwayne Wade also voiced his support for Richardson, writing: "But majority of y’all rule makers smoke and probably are investors in THC companies. Let’s stop playing these games".

Richardson had caused many to hope that the US would receive its first gold medal in the women's race since Gail Devers in 1996 after she completed the 100-meter race in 10.86 seconds - which was one of five runs this season that she finished in under 11 seconds.

In an interview with NBC's Today show, Richardson said of her suspension: "As much as I’m disappointed, I know that when I step on the track, I don’t represent myself. I represent a community that has shown me great support, great love, and I failed you all.

"So I apologize for the fact that I didn’t know how to control my emotions or deal with my emotions."

Featured image credit: REUTERS / Alamy

Seth Rogen and other celebs speak out in defense of Sha’Carri Richardson

vt-author-image

By stefan armitage

Article saved!Article saved!

Following Sha’Carri Richardson's suspension from the 100-meter race at the Tokyo Olympics, celebrities such as Seth Rogen have spoken out in defense of the athlete.

Yesterday, it was announced that Richardson would be suspended from running in the Olympic 100m race in Tokyo, following her testing positive for THC - a chemical found in marijuana.

Richardson - hailed as "America's Fastest Woman" - also had her winning performance at the US Olympic Trials invalidated by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

Prior to the news of her test results being announced, the 21-year-old tweeted on Thursday: "I am human."

After originally qualifying for the Olympic games, Richardson captured the hearts of viewers after she was seen running into the arms of her grandmother. The athlete later revealed to NBC in a post-race interview that she had received the news that her mother had died a week before the event.

She described the loss as "triggering" and "shocking".

Considering that the recreational use of marijuana is legal in many states across the US - and many countries around the world - supporters have taken to social media to call Richardson's suspension "unfair".

One star to speak out in defense of Richardson is actor Seth Rogen - who has long been an outspoken user and advocate for marijuana.

Rogen tweeted alongside a video interview with Richardson: "The notion that weed is a problematic 'drug' is rooted in racism.

"It’s insane that Team USA would disqualify one of this country’s most talented athletes over thinking that’s rooted in hatred. It’s something they should be ashamed of. Also if weed made you fast, I’d be FloJo [80s Olympian Florence Joyner]."

Former American figure skater Adam Rippon also tweeted his support, writing: "My heart is broken for @itskerrii. I think she is an amazing athlete and her personality is superstar level. Marijuana being a banned substance in competition seems… outdated???? And unfair."

Queer Eye star Johnathan Van Ness also tweeted their response, saying: "To punish this incredible athlete for cannabis?? This prohibition has f***ed up so many peoples lives I just can’t even. We love you @itskerrii".

Dwayne Wade also voiced his support for Richardson, writing: "But majority of y’all rule makers smoke and probably are investors in THC companies. Let’s stop playing these games".

Richardson had caused many to hope that the US would receive its first gold medal in the women's race since Gail Devers in 1996 after she completed the 100-meter race in 10.86 seconds - which was one of five runs this season that she finished in under 11 seconds.

In an interview with NBC's Today show, Richardson said of her suspension: "As much as I’m disappointed, I know that when I step on the track, I don’t represent myself. I represent a community that has shown me great support, great love, and I failed you all.

"So I apologize for the fact that I didn’t know how to control my emotions or deal with my emotions."

Featured image credit: REUTERS / Alamy