Woman warned she was in great danger after posting seemingly innocent photo of her hair

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By Kim Novak

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A woman only realized she had been in grave danger after sharing a photo of her hair standing on end to Facebook.

Facebook user Natalie Stevens took to the social media platform to share what she thought was just a humorous snap of her on the beach.

In the photo, parts of her hair could be seen standing up at right angles to her head as she walked down an overcast shore.

She told her followers: "My hair!! Dog walking at La Rocque around 07:30 felt a very tingly feeling in my head/forehead & hair going static for around 10/15mins. Could hear the thunder on the French coast."

The seemingly innocent photo garnered a lot of attention. Credit: Facebook/Natalie Stevens

However, what seemed like an innocent stroll at the time could have spelled disaster for Natalie, as users on the Jersey Weather Chat group soon pointed out that she could have been moments from serious injury or death.

They pointed out that your hair standing on end while outside in inclement weather is actually a warning sign that lightning is about to strike you and urgent action should be taken to get to safety.

One user wrote: "You were about two minutes away from dying or being severely hurt" while another added: "You are one lucky woman to still be alive."

One commented: "When this happens, it is a very good indicator of lighting, and that you could be in danger of being struck. It is time to get indoors."

People warned Natalie of the danger she was in. Credit: Facebook

Another explained: "This is because of negative ions coming down and positive ions reaching up from you as a high point on the beach. When they connect lightning can strike. It’s a sign of imminent danger."

According to Weather.gov, the commenters were absolutely right that serious danger could have been close by, as it advises: "If your hair stands on end, lightning is about to strike you. Drop to your knees and bend forward but don't lie flat on the ground. Wet ground is a good conductor of electricity."

It also advises against being the highest point in a landscape, avoiding open fields or beaches as well as hilltops when storms are brewing.

If caught outdoors during a thunderstorm, you must avoid standing near "natural lightning rods" such as isolated trees or telephone or flag poles, with a safe distance being twice the height of the object.

Should you notice the threat of lightning, you should get inside as quickly as possible into a house, large building, or all-metal vehicle. Shelter can also be sought under a thick growth of small trees - but always avoid tall or isolated trees if sheltering outdoors.

Any metal objects in your hands, such as an umbrella or a golf club can also be a conductor so these must be put down, and it is best to stay away from electrical equipment during an electrical storm.

Being struck by lightning can be deadly, but prompt mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage can increase the chance of survival, however, lightning strikes often leave people with grave injuries.

In the US, there is an average of 43 lightning deaths per year according to the National Weather Service, with around 10% of people struck by lightning dying from their injuries, while the remaining 90% that survive are left with various degrees of disability as a result.

Experts agree with the Facebook commenters. Credit: Boris Jordan Photography / Getty

After her post elicited such a huge response, Natalie added: "I did start to get a little nervous & headed higher up the beach!"

She also told another commenter: "Goodness knows what it would have looked like if I hadn’t had my hair tied back! It was a really weird sensation."

Thankfully, Natalie managed to get to safety - albeit without ever knowing she was in danger - without coming into contact with the lightning.

Featured image credit: Facebook

Woman warned she was in great danger after posting seemingly innocent photo of her hair

vt-author-image

By Kim Novak

Article saved!Article saved!

A woman only realized she had been in grave danger after sharing a photo of her hair standing on end to Facebook.

Facebook user Natalie Stevens took to the social media platform to share what she thought was just a humorous snap of her on the beach.

In the photo, parts of her hair could be seen standing up at right angles to her head as she walked down an overcast shore.

She told her followers: "My hair!! Dog walking at La Rocque around 07:30 felt a very tingly feeling in my head/forehead & hair going static for around 10/15mins. Could hear the thunder on the French coast."

The seemingly innocent photo garnered a lot of attention. Credit: Facebook/Natalie Stevens

However, what seemed like an innocent stroll at the time could have spelled disaster for Natalie, as users on the Jersey Weather Chat group soon pointed out that she could have been moments from serious injury or death.

They pointed out that your hair standing on end while outside in inclement weather is actually a warning sign that lightning is about to strike you and urgent action should be taken to get to safety.

One user wrote: "You were about two minutes away from dying or being severely hurt" while another added: "You are one lucky woman to still be alive."

One commented: "When this happens, it is a very good indicator of lighting, and that you could be in danger of being struck. It is time to get indoors."

People warned Natalie of the danger she was in. Credit: Facebook

Another explained: "This is because of negative ions coming down and positive ions reaching up from you as a high point on the beach. When they connect lightning can strike. It’s a sign of imminent danger."

According to Weather.gov, the commenters were absolutely right that serious danger could have been close by, as it advises: "If your hair stands on end, lightning is about to strike you. Drop to your knees and bend forward but don't lie flat on the ground. Wet ground is a good conductor of electricity."

It also advises against being the highest point in a landscape, avoiding open fields or beaches as well as hilltops when storms are brewing.

If caught outdoors during a thunderstorm, you must avoid standing near "natural lightning rods" such as isolated trees or telephone or flag poles, with a safe distance being twice the height of the object.

Should you notice the threat of lightning, you should get inside as quickly as possible into a house, large building, or all-metal vehicle. Shelter can also be sought under a thick growth of small trees - but always avoid tall or isolated trees if sheltering outdoors.

Any metal objects in your hands, such as an umbrella or a golf club can also be a conductor so these must be put down, and it is best to stay away from electrical equipment during an electrical storm.

Being struck by lightning can be deadly, but prompt mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage can increase the chance of survival, however, lightning strikes often leave people with grave injuries.

In the US, there is an average of 43 lightning deaths per year according to the National Weather Service, with around 10% of people struck by lightning dying from their injuries, while the remaining 90% that survive are left with various degrees of disability as a result.

Experts agree with the Facebook commenters. Credit: Boris Jordan Photography / Getty

After her post elicited such a huge response, Natalie added: "I did start to get a little nervous & headed higher up the beach!"

She also told another commenter: "Goodness knows what it would have looked like if I hadn’t had my hair tied back! It was a really weird sensation."

Thankfully, Natalie managed to get to safety - albeit without ever knowing she was in danger - without coming into contact with the lightning.

Featured image credit: Facebook