Homeless man who saved baby rolling into speeding traffic lands job straight after

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By Asiya Ali

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A homeless man who saved a baby from rolling towards speeding traffic has revealed that he landed a job at a Southern California Applebee's.

As previously reported, a good samaritan named Ron Nessman was leaving a job interview at the restaurant chain when he saw a stroller heading directly into traffic on May 1.

After seeing a woman - who was discovered to be the baby's great aunt - struggling to stand up after stumbling to the ground due to strong winds, he rushed over to the stroller and saved the infant.

His heroic and immediate effort stopped the stroller from making its way down to the driveway and into the path of incoming vehicles.

Watch the video below:

According to People, the man shared more details about the incident and said that when he went back to help the woman - who is in her sixties - she "was crying" and "in shock".

"Her knees were bleeding, she was traumatized from falling and from the baby going into traffic. I can only imagine what was going on in her head. It was heart-wrenching," he added.

In any case, Nessman ultimately ended up getting the job he'd interviewed for, as well as receiving several other offers of work.

He told NBC San Diego that he will be washing dishes in the kitchen and remarked: "I'll earn everything I get so with that in mind, you know, I appreciate the opportunity that Applebee's has given me. It's really cool."

According to Applebee’s General Manager Emily Canady, the viral video had nothing to do with the company's choice to employ the man.

"He's a great guy and he was a great candidate, and he'll definitely fit with us here in Team Victorville at Applebee’s," the manager explained, per the outlet.

Nessman has been homeless for eight years and shared that he is excited for the next chapter in his life. He added that despite the fundraisers people have started for him on social media, he wants to be able to make his own money.

"I gotta come to work tomorrow and I can hardly wait to start doing what I do, you know what I mean? It's going to be a good feeling," he said.

Nessman is a former truck driver and recently moved to Hesperia to rebuild his life after his girlfriend passed away in 2018. He said that her death was "sudden" and made him not "want to do anything" so he became homeless shortly after.

He shared that if he didn't stop the stroller then he "wouldn't be able to live" with himself, and added that he hopes the situation will remind parents to make sure they always lock the wheels.

In addition to this, the man disclosed he had no idea the viral video had reached so many people as even family members from Florida and Missouri contacted him to say that they saw it.

"I decided to get right. If you want something different in your life, you do something different and that's where I am at today. I thank my sister for helping me out. She's always been there for me," he said.

Featured image credit: Ian Dagnall / Alamy

Homeless man who saved baby rolling into speeding traffic lands job straight after

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

A homeless man who saved a baby from rolling towards speeding traffic has revealed that he landed a job at a Southern California Applebee's.

As previously reported, a good samaritan named Ron Nessman was leaving a job interview at the restaurant chain when he saw a stroller heading directly into traffic on May 1.

After seeing a woman - who was discovered to be the baby's great aunt - struggling to stand up after stumbling to the ground due to strong winds, he rushed over to the stroller and saved the infant.

His heroic and immediate effort stopped the stroller from making its way down to the driveway and into the path of incoming vehicles.

Watch the video below:

According to People, the man shared more details about the incident and said that when he went back to help the woman - who is in her sixties - she "was crying" and "in shock".

"Her knees were bleeding, she was traumatized from falling and from the baby going into traffic. I can only imagine what was going on in her head. It was heart-wrenching," he added.

In any case, Nessman ultimately ended up getting the job he'd interviewed for, as well as receiving several other offers of work.

He told NBC San Diego that he will be washing dishes in the kitchen and remarked: "I'll earn everything I get so with that in mind, you know, I appreciate the opportunity that Applebee's has given me. It's really cool."

According to Applebee’s General Manager Emily Canady, the viral video had nothing to do with the company's choice to employ the man.

"He's a great guy and he was a great candidate, and he'll definitely fit with us here in Team Victorville at Applebee’s," the manager explained, per the outlet.

Nessman has been homeless for eight years and shared that he is excited for the next chapter in his life. He added that despite the fundraisers people have started for him on social media, he wants to be able to make his own money.

"I gotta come to work tomorrow and I can hardly wait to start doing what I do, you know what I mean? It's going to be a good feeling," he said.

Nessman is a former truck driver and recently moved to Hesperia to rebuild his life after his girlfriend passed away in 2018. He said that her death was "sudden" and made him not "want to do anything" so he became homeless shortly after.

He shared that if he didn't stop the stroller then he "wouldn't be able to live" with himself, and added that he hopes the situation will remind parents to make sure they always lock the wheels.

In addition to this, the man disclosed he had no idea the viral video had reached so many people as even family members from Florida and Missouri contacted him to say that they saw it.

"I decided to get right. If you want something different in your life, you do something different and that's where I am at today. I thank my sister for helping me out. She's always been there for me," he said.

Featured image credit: Ian Dagnall / Alamy