Moment 'God Save the King' is sung officially for the first time in 70 years

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By Asiya Ali

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After seven decades, the first official rendition of 'God Save the King' was sung at the memorial service for Queen Elizabeth II at St Paul’s Cathedral on Friday.

For more than 70 years, the British national anthem has been 'God Save the Queen', but following the death of the late Queen and the ascension to the throne of her son, King Charles III, the national anthem has changed.

Hundreds of people came together for the historic occasion in St. Paul's Cathedral, replacing the word "Queen" with "King" and "her victorious" with "him victorious" in the national anthem.

The official rendition was sung for the first time in 70 years and marked the King taking over as the new monarch. It also comes after crowds spontaneously sang the new version outside Buckingham Palace on Thursday (September 8).

Watch the official rendition below:

About 2,000 dignitaries and members of the public had gathered for the church service at the renowned cathedral in London to honor the late monarch - who had reigned longer than any sovereign in British history.

The early evening service was attended by the British prime minister, Liz Truss, as well as the mayor of London Sadiq Khan, leader of the Labour party Sir Keir Starmer, and the speaker of the House of Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle.

Prior to the ceremony, there was silence so that those attending and viewers at home could listen to the eight-minute address of the new monarch, King Charles III, who thanked the country and confirmed that his heir, Prince William, is to now be known as the Prince of Wales.

Though the speech started with the words of a resilient king, it ended with a son grieving his mother, saying: "To my darling Mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear late Papa, I want simply to say this: thank you."

"Thank you for your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years," adding, "May flights of Angels sing thee to thy rest".

wp-image-1263168657 size-full
Credit: BBC

It was at the end of the service that 'God Save the King' was played in an official capacity for the first time since the death of the the Queen's father, King George VI, on February 6, 1952.

King George VI's death marked the start of the late Queen's historic seven-decade reign, up until her death at her residence in Balmoral Castle in Scotland on Thursday (September 8) evening.

On Saturday (September 10), King Charles III was proclaimed King and Head of the Commonwealth after a history Accession ceremony. During his declaration, he promised to follow his mother's "inspiring example" as he takes over.

In attendance for the triumphant event were the Prince of Wales, Queen Consort Camilla, and serving politicians and all living former prime ministers.

Crowds gathered outside to witness the momentous occasion and sing a rendition of God Save The King as the band played and give three cheers to the new monarch.

A wave of further proclamations will continue to take place across the United Kingdom until Sunday (September 11).

Featured image credit: Doug Peters / Alamy

Moment 'God Save the King' is sung officially for the first time in 70 years

vt-author-image

By Asiya Ali

Article saved!Article saved!

After seven decades, the first official rendition of 'God Save the King' was sung at the memorial service for Queen Elizabeth II at St Paul’s Cathedral on Friday.

For more than 70 years, the British national anthem has been 'God Save the Queen', but following the death of the late Queen and the ascension to the throne of her son, King Charles III, the national anthem has changed.

Hundreds of people came together for the historic occasion in St. Paul's Cathedral, replacing the word "Queen" with "King" and "her victorious" with "him victorious" in the national anthem.

The official rendition was sung for the first time in 70 years and marked the King taking over as the new monarch. It also comes after crowds spontaneously sang the new version outside Buckingham Palace on Thursday (September 8).

Watch the official rendition below:

About 2,000 dignitaries and members of the public had gathered for the church service at the renowned cathedral in London to honor the late monarch - who had reigned longer than any sovereign in British history.

The early evening service was attended by the British prime minister, Liz Truss, as well as the mayor of London Sadiq Khan, leader of the Labour party Sir Keir Starmer, and the speaker of the House of Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle.

Prior to the ceremony, there was silence so that those attending and viewers at home could listen to the eight-minute address of the new monarch, King Charles III, who thanked the country and confirmed that his heir, Prince William, is to now be known as the Prince of Wales.

Though the speech started with the words of a resilient king, it ended with a son grieving his mother, saying: "To my darling Mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear late Papa, I want simply to say this: thank you."

"Thank you for your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years," adding, "May flights of Angels sing thee to thy rest".

wp-image-1263168657 size-full
Credit: BBC

It was at the end of the service that 'God Save the King' was played in an official capacity for the first time since the death of the the Queen's father, King George VI, on February 6, 1952.

King George VI's death marked the start of the late Queen's historic seven-decade reign, up until her death at her residence in Balmoral Castle in Scotland on Thursday (September 8) evening.

On Saturday (September 10), King Charles III was proclaimed King and Head of the Commonwealth after a history Accession ceremony. During his declaration, he promised to follow his mother's "inspiring example" as he takes over.

In attendance for the triumphant event were the Prince of Wales, Queen Consort Camilla, and serving politicians and all living former prime ministers.

Crowds gathered outside to witness the momentous occasion and sing a rendition of God Save The King as the band played and give three cheers to the new monarch.

A wave of further proclamations will continue to take place across the United Kingdom until Sunday (September 11).

Featured image credit: Doug Peters / Alamy