OnlyFans star says they shouldn't have to pay tax because their work feels like 'charity work'

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By Kim Novak

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An OnlyFans star has claimed adult content creators on the platform shouldn't have to pay tax on their earnings as what they do feels like "charity work".

OnlyFan has exploded in recent years, with top earners on the paid subscription platform making absolute fortunes from their followers.

However, the bigger the earnings the more tax a person usually has to pay, regardless of the line of work they happen to be in.

Billie Beever, who is an Australian OnlyFans creator and adult entertainer, has argued that OnlyFans models "shouldn't have to pay tax" as their work is more like a "public service".

Billie, who won the Best Female Porn Star award at the Australian Adult Industry Choice Awards, explained why she believes the Australian Taxation Office should cut OnlyFans stars some slack.

She told Yahoo: "The more these girls talk about how much they're making, the less true it usually is. Usually just half what they say they're making and that's closer to the truth, then half it again because of tax and OnlyFans' cut."

Billie admitted that many creators receive hateful messages from people telling them to "get real jobs", so she believes the fact their work isn't considered a "real job" by many should mean it is also exempt from tax.

She explained: "Every day we all get hate messages saying what we do isn't a real job, and we should go get a real job. So if that's true and the public really think that, we shouldn't pay taxes then, especially when we pay so much more than most people.

"Also why should we have to pay tax on our body parts if I choose to use them to make money?"

She compared her job to being like a "public service" and said it often feels like "charity work", especially when fulfilling custom requests from her customers.

Her comments come after the Australian Taxation Office revealed that it sees OnlyFans creators much like any other business, with a spokesperson saying: "It's a new industry and one we're watching to better understand, but the way we see tax deductions remains the same.

"We see OnlyFans creators as businesses with operating expenses and deductions."

The platform saw an increase in creators as the cost of living increased, meaning people were turning to alternative means to make some extra cash.

Another adult entertainer, Tasha Paige, was also stunned to receive a tax bill of $86,000, which was later revised to be owing $176,000 instead.

wp-image-1263237747 size-full
OnlyFans can be a lucrative job for the top creators on the platform - but it comes with tax liabilities too. Credit: Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images

She revealed that she recently reached an income of over seven figures with her content, but her earnings for the last tax year were less than that, though significantly over the tax-free threshold of $18,200 for the year.

Tasha told the outlet that she finds the rules frustrating, explaining: "It's annoying when [the government] are like, 'Oh, you guys have to pay GST [Goods and Services Tax] now' when we're not actually, you know, selling a product per se.

"That kind of shows that they see us as a product because we earn by selling ourselves online.

"It's just a bit frustrating because we're not actually giving them anything that's an object; it's all virtual."

Featured image credit: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

 

OnlyFans star says they shouldn't have to pay tax because their work feels like 'charity work'

vt-author-image

By Kim Novak

Article saved!Article saved!

An OnlyFans star has claimed adult content creators on the platform shouldn't have to pay tax on their earnings as what they do feels like "charity work".

OnlyFan has exploded in recent years, with top earners on the paid subscription platform making absolute fortunes from their followers.

However, the bigger the earnings the more tax a person usually has to pay, regardless of the line of work they happen to be in.

Billie Beever, who is an Australian OnlyFans creator and adult entertainer, has argued that OnlyFans models "shouldn't have to pay tax" as their work is more like a "public service".

Billie, who won the Best Female Porn Star award at the Australian Adult Industry Choice Awards, explained why she believes the Australian Taxation Office should cut OnlyFans stars some slack.

She told Yahoo: "The more these girls talk about how much they're making, the less true it usually is. Usually just half what they say they're making and that's closer to the truth, then half it again because of tax and OnlyFans' cut."

Billie admitted that many creators receive hateful messages from people telling them to "get real jobs", so she believes the fact their work isn't considered a "real job" by many should mean it is also exempt from tax.

She explained: "Every day we all get hate messages saying what we do isn't a real job, and we should go get a real job. So if that's true and the public really think that, we shouldn't pay taxes then, especially when we pay so much more than most people.

"Also why should we have to pay tax on our body parts if I choose to use them to make money?"

She compared her job to being like a "public service" and said it often feels like "charity work", especially when fulfilling custom requests from her customers.

Her comments come after the Australian Taxation Office revealed that it sees OnlyFans creators much like any other business, with a spokesperson saying: "It's a new industry and one we're watching to better understand, but the way we see tax deductions remains the same.

"We see OnlyFans creators as businesses with operating expenses and deductions."

The platform saw an increase in creators as the cost of living increased, meaning people were turning to alternative means to make some extra cash.

Another adult entertainer, Tasha Paige, was also stunned to receive a tax bill of $86,000, which was later revised to be owing $176,000 instead.

wp-image-1263237747 size-full
OnlyFans can be a lucrative job for the top creators on the platform - but it comes with tax liabilities too. Credit: Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images

She revealed that she recently reached an income of over seven figures with her content, but her earnings for the last tax year were less than that, though significantly over the tax-free threshold of $18,200 for the year.

Tasha told the outlet that she finds the rules frustrating, explaining: "It's annoying when [the government] are like, 'Oh, you guys have to pay GST [Goods and Services Tax] now' when we're not actually, you know, selling a product per se.

"That kind of shows that they see us as a product because we earn by selling ourselves online.

"It's just a bit frustrating because we're not actually giving them anything that's an object; it's all virtual."

Featured image credit: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images