Southwest launches investigation after Boeing 737 flew below 500 feet over homes, leaving residents terrified

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By James Kay

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Southwest Airlines has launched an investigation after a flight landing in Oklahoma City flew less than 500 feet above a residential neighborhood.

The dangerously low altitude of Southwest Airlines flight 4069 from Las Vegas was recorded by transponders and caught the attention of air traffic controllers.

Shortly after midnight, the Boeing 737-800 passed by Yukon High School after it was cleared to land at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, according to the Oklahoman.

GettyImages-2153943867.jpgResidents got a shock from the Southwest plane. Credit: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/Getty

“Southwest 4069, low altitude alert,” an air traffic controller warned. “You good out there?”

The commercial jet eventually landed safely after regaining altitude and circling the airport, the newspaper reported.

Officials confirmed that the plane missed its approach during the first landing attempt.

The close encounter left local residents shaken.

“It woke me up and I thought it was gonna hit my house,” a person said in a local Facebook group, according to the Oklahoman.

Southwest said in a statement it is investigating the incident with federal officials.

“Southwest is following its robust Safety Management System and is in contact with the Federal Aviation Administration to understand and address any irregularities with the aircraft’s approach to the airport,” a spokesperson stated, per the New York Post.

“Nothing is more important to Southwest than the Safety of our Customers and Employees.”

GettyImages-2151560916.jpgKevin Carter/Getty

In other news regarding Southwest, a Boeing 737 Max was grounded following a frightening "Dutch roll" incident at 32,000 feet.

Officials revealed that the aircraft had been out of service for 20 days after experiencing the perilous Dutch roll, which caused it to sway from side to side, marking another setback for the aviation giant.

The incident occurred on a Southwest Airlines flight from Phoenix, Arizona, to Oakland, California, with 175 passengers and six crew members on board.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft experienced unsafe oscillation of the tail and wings mid-flight on June 12.

Although pilots managed to regain control, a post-landing inspection revealed significant damage to the standby power control unit, which is critical for backup rudder power. Fortunately, no injuries were reported among passengers, but the damage to the aircraft was described as substantial.


"The FAA is collaborating closely with the NTSB and Boeing to investigate this incident. We will take appropriate actions based on the investigation's findings," the FAA stated in response to inquiries from The Independent, highlighting that no similar issues have been reported by other airlines.

Boeing declined to comment directly, redirecting inquiries to Southwest Airlines. A Southwest Airlines spokesperson directed attention to ongoing investigations by the NTSB and FAA, adding: "Southwest is participating in and supporting the investigation."

Feature image credit: Kevin Carter/Getty

Southwest launches investigation after Boeing 737 flew below 500 feet over homes, leaving residents terrified

vt-author-image

By James Kay

Article saved!Article saved!

Southwest Airlines has launched an investigation after a flight landing in Oklahoma City flew less than 500 feet above a residential neighborhood.

The dangerously low altitude of Southwest Airlines flight 4069 from Las Vegas was recorded by transponders and caught the attention of air traffic controllers.

Shortly after midnight, the Boeing 737-800 passed by Yukon High School after it was cleared to land at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, according to the Oklahoman.

GettyImages-2153943867.jpgResidents got a shock from the Southwest plane. Credit: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/Getty

“Southwest 4069, low altitude alert,” an air traffic controller warned. “You good out there?”

The commercial jet eventually landed safely after regaining altitude and circling the airport, the newspaper reported.

Officials confirmed that the plane missed its approach during the first landing attempt.

The close encounter left local residents shaken.

“It woke me up and I thought it was gonna hit my house,” a person said in a local Facebook group, according to the Oklahoman.

Southwest said in a statement it is investigating the incident with federal officials.

“Southwest is following its robust Safety Management System and is in contact with the Federal Aviation Administration to understand and address any irregularities with the aircraft’s approach to the airport,” a spokesperson stated, per the New York Post.

“Nothing is more important to Southwest than the Safety of our Customers and Employees.”

GettyImages-2151560916.jpgKevin Carter/Getty

In other news regarding Southwest, a Boeing 737 Max was grounded following a frightening "Dutch roll" incident at 32,000 feet.

Officials revealed that the aircraft had been out of service for 20 days after experiencing the perilous Dutch roll, which caused it to sway from side to side, marking another setback for the aviation giant.

The incident occurred on a Southwest Airlines flight from Phoenix, Arizona, to Oakland, California, with 175 passengers and six crew members on board.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft experienced unsafe oscillation of the tail and wings mid-flight on June 12.

Although pilots managed to regain control, a post-landing inspection revealed significant damage to the standby power control unit, which is critical for backup rudder power. Fortunately, no injuries were reported among passengers, but the damage to the aircraft was described as substantial.


"The FAA is collaborating closely with the NTSB and Boeing to investigate this incident. We will take appropriate actions based on the investigation's findings," the FAA stated in response to inquiries from The Independent, highlighting that no similar issues have been reported by other airlines.

Boeing declined to comment directly, redirecting inquiries to Southwest Airlines. A Southwest Airlines spokesperson directed attention to ongoing investigations by the NTSB and FAA, adding: "Southwest is participating in and supporting the investigation."

Feature image credit: Kevin Carter/Getty