People are pointing out all the ‘red flags’ in Christmas classic ‘Love Actually'

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By Nasima Khatun

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With Christmas just around the corner, we're getting ourselves in the festive mood with some classics - mulled wine, decorations, and of course, Christmas movies!

From Home Alone to Die Hard (yes, it's totally a Christmas classic), we're giving all the icons a watch. Amongst those is none other than Love Actually starring Hugh Grant, Martine McCutcheon, Liam Neeson, and Laura Linney.

Hailed as one of the best festive rom-coms in history, Love Actually follows the "lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England."

However, we might have to get in there quickly because there are a few folks out there trying to warn us about the "red flags" that were presented in the movie - and this might be the first time I'm completely avoiding them.

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Colin Firth, Martine McCutcheon, Hugh Grant, Keira Knightley, and Alan Rickman arrive at the UK premiere of the film Love Actually. Credit: Dave Benett/Getty

On an episode of the Jeremy Vine show from last year, the host tore into the movie, emphasizing that there are five so-called "red flags" that people should be aware of before watching.

The clip starts with Vine pointing out that all the characters in the film are white except Peter, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, who is Black. However, he adds that "his best friend is a truly ghastly person", which, weirdly enough, becomes red flag number two.

"This guy is the one who is basically in love with Keira Knightly, who is married," he continues, also questioning: "[Are we] supposed to think it's interesting? It's sort of, somehow, I don't know, exciting or sympathetic?"

The 57-year-old then goes and brands him a "stalker" before quickly getting onto red flag number three: "All the couples are straight."

"Where are the gay characters?", he asks.

Vine then turns his attention to the fact that Natalie, played by McCutcheon, is constantly "fat-shamed" throughout the movie.

"Why the fat shaming?", he asks before the segment cuts to a compilation of clips taken from Love Actually where the characters call her "chubby" and "plumpy".

The final red flag in Vine's series is the alleged control of all the women by their respective men - bit of a push with this one but we'll go with it, I guess.

Have a look at the three-minute clip below:

After the clip garnered some attention online, some users took to the comments to share their opinions on the matter.

"Utter nonsense. Clearly you’ve run out of things to moralise on. Best Film Ever," wrote one person, while another added: "Jeremy, I love you but shut up honestly it’s one of the best films of all time I love it."

A third was also less than impressed, stating: "I despise everything about this clip. It is a worldview that brings out the worst in everyone. The rabbit hole of identity politics is social apartheid by the back door and only gets nastier. Shame on you."

Big yikes.

Will you still be watching Love Actually this Christmas?

Featured Image Credit: Dave Benett/Getty

People are pointing out all the ‘red flags’ in Christmas classic ‘Love Actually'

vt-author-image

By Nasima Khatun

Article saved!Article saved!

With Christmas just around the corner, we're getting ourselves in the festive mood with some classics - mulled wine, decorations, and of course, Christmas movies!

From Home Alone to Die Hard (yes, it's totally a Christmas classic), we're giving all the icons a watch. Amongst those is none other than Love Actually starring Hugh Grant, Martine McCutcheon, Liam Neeson, and Laura Linney.

Hailed as one of the best festive rom-coms in history, Love Actually follows the "lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England."

However, we might have to get in there quickly because there are a few folks out there trying to warn us about the "red flags" that were presented in the movie - and this might be the first time I'm completely avoiding them.

wp-image-1263240625 size-full
Colin Firth, Martine McCutcheon, Hugh Grant, Keira Knightley, and Alan Rickman arrive at the UK premiere of the film Love Actually. Credit: Dave Benett/Getty

On an episode of the Jeremy Vine show from last year, the host tore into the movie, emphasizing that there are five so-called "red flags" that people should be aware of before watching.

The clip starts with Vine pointing out that all the characters in the film are white except Peter, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, who is Black. However, he adds that "his best friend is a truly ghastly person", which, weirdly enough, becomes red flag number two.

"This guy is the one who is basically in love with Keira Knightly, who is married," he continues, also questioning: "[Are we] supposed to think it's interesting? It's sort of, somehow, I don't know, exciting or sympathetic?"

The 57-year-old then goes and brands him a "stalker" before quickly getting onto red flag number three: "All the couples are straight."

"Where are the gay characters?", he asks.

Vine then turns his attention to the fact that Natalie, played by McCutcheon, is constantly "fat-shamed" throughout the movie.

"Why the fat shaming?", he asks before the segment cuts to a compilation of clips taken from Love Actually where the characters call her "chubby" and "plumpy".

The final red flag in Vine's series is the alleged control of all the women by their respective men - bit of a push with this one but we'll go with it, I guess.

Have a look at the three-minute clip below:

After the clip garnered some attention online, some users took to the comments to share their opinions on the matter.

"Utter nonsense. Clearly you’ve run out of things to moralise on. Best Film Ever," wrote one person, while another added: "Jeremy, I love you but shut up honestly it’s one of the best films of all time I love it."

A third was also less than impressed, stating: "I despise everything about this clip. It is a worldview that brings out the worst in everyone. The rabbit hole of identity politics is social apartheid by the back door and only gets nastier. Shame on you."

Big yikes.

Will you still be watching Love Actually this Christmas?

Featured Image Credit: Dave Benett/Getty